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Welcome to the interactive web schedule for CitSci2017! For tips on how to navigate this site, visit the "Helpful Info" section. To return to the main Citizen Science Association website, go to: http://citizenscience.org/association/conferences/citsci2017/. All events will be held at the St. Paul RiverCentre unless otherwise noted.

PLEASE NOTE:
Adding agenda items to your schedule through this app does not sign you up for a session. If an agenda item says "pre-registration required" or charges an additional fee, you need to add the item to your registration through the online registration system (https://citizenscience.member365.com/ then select "manage event registrations"), or stop by the registration desk onsite. 

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Tuesday, May 16
 

9:00am

3:00pm

 
Wednesday, May 17
 

7:00am

Speaker Ready Room
Wednesday May 17, 2017 7:00am - 3:30pm
Meeting Room 1

7:00am

8:00am

WORKING GROUP: Research & Evaluation Working Group Internal Meeting (Invitation Only)
This meeting is intended to provide a face to face opportunity for the R & E Working Group sub groups to create viable plans and strategies to implement work for the upcoming year. We expect to provide each subgroup with 90 minutes to articulate and document their strategy. The remaining 90 minutes will be divided up so that each subgroup gets 30 minutes to share their ideas with the larger working group and solicit additional feedback. Plans and strategies will be documented in a public space.

Wednesday May 17, 2017 8:00am - 10:00am
Meeting Room 6

8:30am

8:45am

Create Together Day (formerly referred to as Hack-a-Thon) (pre-registration and additional fee: $45)
Sponsored by: University of Minnesota - College of Science and Engineering
Conveners: Lucy Fortson, Brooke Simmons, Hugh Dickinson, Andrea Simenstad, Mark SubbaRao and others.

The vision for Create Together Day (formerly referred to as a hack-a-thon) has expanded to an inclusive event for any citizen science practitioners with a desire to share great ideas. Collaborate with other conference goers to create products, interfaces, or data visualizations to further your citizen science projects. Options available include creating a Zooniverse project in a day, learning how to effectively use iNaturalist, embedding free volunteer recruiting and management tools from SciStarter, capturing and visualizing location-based data using ArcGIS, creating new education and outreach materials, or discovering how to use virtual/augmented reality in citizen science projects. Eager to work with practitioners that have a wide variety of skills? Add this event to your schedule, and join the experts who will be on hand to help with popular tools. Bring your data, bring your devices, bring your project ideas – leave with something awesome! We’ll supply breakfast, lunch and endless coffee (or water!).

Note: This event is off-site at the University of Minnesota. Transportation will be provided to and from the St. Paul RiverCentre conference venue. Bus departs at 8:00 AM.)
Location: Courtyard in Ralph Rapson Hall, 89 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455
Intended Audience: Anyone Interested
Fee: $45; pre-registration required. Breakfast and lunch provided. 

Wednesday May 17, 2017 8:45am - 4:00pm
Offsite: University of Minnesota

9:00am

Poster Setup
All poster presenters are encouraged to set up Wednesday and tear down on Friday so that attendees have plenty of time to visit all posters. 

Wednesday May 17, 2017 9:00am - 12:00pm
Ballroom

9:00am

WORKSHOP: Collective Troubleshooting and Problem Solving (pre-registration required)
Dana Buchlinder; Hannah Webber - SCHOODIC Institute; Malin Clyde - UNH; Michelle Prysby - UVA

The professional development working group will facilitate a workshop focused on problems with implementing citizen science. We've all been there before - we run into snags in our projects, even with the best laid plans. In this workshop we will crowdsource solutions to different problems that practitioners are struggling with. What to bring? Problems you are struggling with and a willingness to strategize and troubleshoot collectively.

Intended Audience: Beginners to Advanced

Fee: None; pre-registration required 

Wednesday May 17, 2017 9:00am - 12:00pm
Meeting Room 5

9:00am

Exhibitor Setup
Wednesday May 17, 2017 9:00am - 5:00pm
Ballroom Concourse

10:00am

Coffee Break
Wednesday May 17, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Ballroom Concourse

10:00am

WORKSHOP: Citizen Science Day (pre-registration required)
Lila Higgins - National History Musum of Los Angeles County; Alison Young - California Academy of Sciences; Catherine Hoffman - SciStarter

During this meeting, we will work with the founding members of the CSA’s Citizen Science Day task force and any other interested people to plan a sustainable approach for Citizen Science Day. Goals include: 1. To solicit community feedback on the recurring date/time for Citizen Science Day. 2. To review Citizen Science Day 2016 and 2017 and to generate feedback for the planning of Citizen Science Day 2018. 3. To discuss risks and difficulties of Citizen Science Day events and to strategize future resources needed to overcome these difficulties and 4. Solicit feedback on planning a wide-scale, annual evaluation plan for Citizen Science Day. The feedback generated on these objectives will lay the groundwork for the Citizen Science Day working group’s objectives for the next year and determine what additional expertise is needed within the working group.

Intended Audience: Professionals: Beginners to Advanced

Fee: None; pre-registration required

Wednesday May 17, 2017 10:00am - 11:30am
Meeting Room 3

10:00am

WORKSHOP & WORKING GROUP: Elevating the Value of Citizen Science Projects by Understanding and Communicating Data Quality / CSA Data and Metadata Working Group (pre-registration required - SOLD OUT)
Robert Stevenson - UMass Boston; Greg Newman - CSA Data and Metadata Working Group; Anne Bowser - Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Caren Cooper - North Carolina State University; Tabitha Graves - United States Geological Survey (USGS); Kyle Copas - Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF); Kris Stepenuck - University of Vermont; Greg Newman - Colorado State University and CitSci.org; Luigi Ceccaroni - 1000001 Labs; Elizabeth Tyson - The Wilson Center

This workshop addresses a fundamental issue in citizen science (CS), “How good are data from citizen science projects and can the data be trusted?” From the point of view of CS practitioners the question is “How can CS projects best communicate their efforts regarding data quality & management to different audiences including participants, data users, funders, scientists, policy- makers, and other projects?” Skeptics argue the scientists undergo years of training and mentoring to learn how to collect data carefully and accurately. Therefore it is not obvious that untrained citizens will be able to collect useful data. In our experience, however, most citizen science programs are aware of the need to attend to data quality. Because of the recent wide adoption of the CS approach, program efforts have been focused on recruiting and engaging participants and building software infrastructure rather than on data quality. Even if citizen science projects have developed data quality assurance and control mechanisms, there are as yet no established procedures to communicate these mechanisms or measurements to others.

Intended Audience: Anyone interested in Data Quality

Fee: None; pre-registration required - SOLD OUT!

Wednesday May 17, 2017 10:00am - 4:30pm
Meeting Room 4

11:30am

WORKSHOP: Recruitment, Retention, Research and Evaluation using SciStarter 2.0 Tools (pre-registration required)
Caren Cooper - North Carolina State University and North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences; Catherine Hoffman - SciStarter; Darlene Cavalier - SciStarter and Arizona State University 

With an AISL NSF award we developed a suite of new tools and functionality in SciStarter.com to better support volunteers and project owners. We want to hold a workshop at the CSA conference to showcase to practitioners the opportunities presented by the SciStarter 2.0 tools to deepen volunteer learning and growth by addressing across-project skew, evolving motivations, seasonal gaps, untapped synergies across projects via movements of volunteers, and other unanticipated factors that can be addressed with intentional planning in the SciStarter network but cannot be addressed via management within project silos. We also want to solicit input from project owners and evaluation/researchers to further improve the site. We anticipate the workshop involving a brief review of the new tools and functionality, some hands-on activities to try out the tools, and concluding with discussion and feedback. We hope to empower project owners to consider how they can leverage synergies with other projects and demonstrate to evaluator/researchers how they can expand their repertoire of techniques beyond surveys to include embedded tracking of volunteer activity across projects and embedded assessment. We hope to set priorities for further improvements to the site based on feedback and discussion.

Intended Audience: All are welcome, but we are especially interested in project owners, those who evaluate citizen science projects, and those who study outcomes for individuals involved in citizen science.

Fee: None; pre-registration required

Wednesday May 17, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Meeting Room 6

12:00pm

1:00pm

WORKSHOP: Citizen Science at the College Level: Learning, Research and Mentoring (pre-registration required)
Thomas Tisue - Muskegon Community College; John R. Jungck - University of Delaware; Aerin W. Benavides - University of North Carolina, Greensboro; Julie Feldt - Adler Planetarium; Colleen Hitchcock - Brandeis University; Leslie Ries - Georgetown University; Terry A. Gates - North Carolina State University

This workshop will unite undergraduate educators to discuss best practices for developing citizen science research within their university classes. Facilitators will discuss experiences with citizen science as a tool for active engagement, inquiry, independent study, mentorship and internship. Examples of how to include citizen science, the opportunities/challenges offered, and student feedback to research experiences will be shared. Attendees will have the opportunity to work in small groups to develop citizen science research opportunities and collaborations for their classes. Breakout groups will be organized based on research interests, assignment types and student learning goals. Focus will be on identifying research opportunities, student learning goals, objectives and outcomes, as well as, grading and engagement logistics. Ideally, participants will come prepared with a course or a project identified for citizen science education integration, although this is not required.

Our perspective is varied and considers a diversity of institutional types (community college through research institutions), of populations (both science majors and non-majors), and of course levels (introductory through advanced studies). Our implementation showcases course formats from independent-study through large lecture and models from contributions in national campaigns to collaborative, co-created and place-based programs. By featuring such diversity we will share how citizen science is both a tool for learning in the undergraduate classroom and a means to increase the range of citizen science participants. Finally, this workshop will bring together a community of undergraduate educators poised for future collaboration and idea dissemination.

Intended Audience: College Educators and K-12 educators interested in supporting curriculum with citizen science

Fee: None; pre-registration required

Wednesday May 17, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Meeting Room 5

1:00pm

WORKSHOP: Learn to Create Data Visualizations: A Hands-On Workshop (pre-registration required and additional fee: $50 - SOLD OUT)
Caroline Donovan; Kevin Ripka

Citizen science projects collect data. First, we will discuss why and how to use that data to meaningfully engage & motivate participants by creating data visualizations. Next, we learn about data viz as a communication device and sketch prototypes for an interactive data visualization using your data, design principles, and the annotation layer. Finally, we’ll touch on tools for turning your prototype into an interactive data visualization. After discussing technologies for designing and delivering various types of visualizations, we’ll explore some free, easily configurable (but slightly limiting) tools before diving into the basics of d3, one of the most popular open source frameworks for bespoke data visualizations on the web.

Intended Audience: TBD

Fee: $50/team; pre-registration required; limited to 20 teams - SOLD OUT

Wednesday May 17, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Meeting Room 7

1:00pm

WORKSHOP: Sparking Positive Youth Development with Citizen Science (pre-registration required - SOLD OUT)
David Bild - Chicago Academy of Sciences / Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum; Ryan Collay - Education by Design; Alexa Maille - Cornell Cooperative Extension; Andrea Lorek Strauss - University of Minnesota Extension; Sarah Carter - STEM Media and Outreach - SciGirls/Twin Cities PBS; Kelly A. Borden - Adler Planetarium/Zooniverse

Educational research increasingly finds that learning beyond school walls is essential to engage and develop STEM-literate and curious citizens. Organizations ranging from primary and secondary schools, museums and universities, and community-based organizations provide out-of- school time programming to supplement as well as complement learning in classroom and home environments. Educators and researchers incorporate citizen science into out-of-school time programs because of its unique opportunity to engage young people in authentic STEM investigations. Positive Youth Development is an important program design and evaluation tool when designing effective educational programs. It recognizes the traits innate in young people as assets and uses the Five C’s: competence, confidence, connections, character, and caring to engage youth within their communities. In this workshop, facilitators and participants will work collaboratively to create concrete strategies for designing and implementing programs that meet the developmental needs of teens as well as the needs of researchers depending on data collected or analyzed by citizen science volunteers. After an overview of the tenets of the Positive Youth Development, out-of-school time program designers will share short “program snapshots” speaking to their individual program’s successes, needed improvements, and best practices for integrating teens into citizen science’s communities of practice. Workshop participants will be invited and encouraged to share their own program design experiences into the conversation. Next, breakout groups will form for a deep-dive into specific Positive Youth Development program design aspects and create strategies for integrating them into existing or newly created programs. After sharing recommended strategies, workshop participants will come away with an understanding of a research based program design framework and be armed with practical implementation strategies they can bring back to their programs, educational colleagues, and home organizations.

Intended Audience: Anyone interested in using citizen science with youth

Fee: None; pre-registration required - SOLD OUT

Wednesday May 17, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Meeting Room 2

1:00pm

WORKSHOP: What is Your Impact? Learn to Evaluate Your Citizen Science Project (pre-registration and additional fee: $15 - SOLD OUT)
Alycia Crall; Tina Phillips; Camellia Sanford

This workshop is intended to provide attendees with a basic understanding of the evaluation process and will cover the following topics: What is evaluation and how is it different from research; what, when, and why to evaluate; planning your evaluation; describing your project using logic models and theory of change; creating an evaluation plan; best practices for implementing your evaluation; collecting data and sharing your results; and resources for further reading. Attendees will work individually and in small groups, and will leave with a preliminary plan for initiating an evaluation within their own programs.

Intended Audience: Practitioners with little or no prior evaluations experience looking for guidance on evaluating their projects

Fee: $15; pre-registration required - SOLD OUT

Wednesday May 17, 2017 1:00pm - 4:00pm
Meeting Room 6

2:00pm

Coffee Break
Wednesday May 17, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Ballroom Concourse

3:30pm

4:00pm

Working Groups 'Open House'
Working Groups are committees which convene to advance the goals of the Citizen Science Association. If you've been wanting to get more involved the working group open house is a great place to start. Read more about CSA Working groups [http://citizenscience.org/association/about/working-groups/]. Plan to drop by to chat about the priorities of each working group and learn what they've been up to, and about ways you might get involved. 

Wednesday May 17, 2017 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Ballroom

5:30pm

Meet the Authors: Book Panel Discussion
Moderated by: Heather McElhatton, MN Public Radio
Sponsored by: Arizona State University's Center for Engagement and Training in Science and Society

Just before the opening reception on Wednesday, 5/17, MN Public Radio’s Heather McElhatton will moderate a one-hour book panel discussion in the Grand Ballroom at the RiverCentre. The event will start promptly at 5:30 pm.

Bring your questions (and book jackets!) for the following authors/panelists:

Wednesday May 17, 2017 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Ballroom

6:30pm

Opening Reception
Join us at the Science Museum of Minnesota for the Opening Reception to CitSci2017. Heavy hors d’oeuvres will be served at this event, and the setting will provide a casual opportunity to meet and connect with friends old and new in the citizen science community. The Science Museum of Minnesota is a 110 year old institution and its current location, which opened in December 1999, is across the street from the St. Paul RiverCentre conference center. The museum is on the banks of the Mississippi River and offers a spectacular perspective of life on the river. Enjoy the reception with colleagues in the museum’s lobby, and whet your whistle to return later in the week for complimentary access (with your conference badge) to the museum exhibits.

Wednesday May 17, 2017 6:30pm - 9:00pm
Offsite: Science Museum of Minnesota
 
Thursday, May 18
 

7:00am

7:00am

Meet the Feds Breakfast Reception
Our federal partners will be on hand to share how best to work with them on citizen science projects. If you can’t make this session, these funders will have posters on display on Thursday. Grab your breakfast and join them for this informative session.

Thursday May 18, 2017 7:00am - 8:00am
Meeting Rooms 2 & 3

7:00am

Speaker Ready Room
Thursday May 18, 2017 7:00am - 11:15am
Meeting Room 1

7:00am

8:00am

8:00am

Keynote Presentation: Dr. Marc Edwards, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech; LeeAnne Walters, Coalition for Clean Water
Dr. Marc Edwards is the Charles P. Lunsford Professor of Environmental and Water Resources Engineering in The Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech. With the support of an NSF grant, and most importantly, engaged citizens, Edwards was instrumental in demonstrating Flint, MI dangerously contaminated water. Citizen LeeAnne Walters, a Flint citizen and mother of four, and member of Coalition for Clean Water, will join Edwards to discuss how they worked together to bring Flint’s water crisis to national, and international, attention.

Keynote Speakers
avatar for Dr. Marc Edwards

Dr. Marc Edwards

Virginia Tech
Dr. Marc Edwards is the Charles P. Lunsford Professor of Environmental and Water Resources Engineering in The Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech.



Thursday May 18, 2017 8:00am - 10:00am
Ballroom

9:45am

Coffee Break
Thursday May 18, 2017 9:45am - 10:00am
Ballroom Concourse

10:00am

A-01: Symposium: Advanced Data Sharing
Advancing Data Sharing in Citizen Science: Considering the Role of Interoperability and Standardization
Organizer: Anne Bowser
In the context of citizen science (CS), interoperability may be broadly considered the ability of systems, people and/or projects to exchange data and other information. There are at least three paths towards interoperability in CS. First, projects may produce interoperable data if they collect compatible information, for example when two projects agree on similar protocols. In these cases, humans must manually create crosswalks before data can be exchanged. Second, projects may be interoperable if each collects data in accordance with a common disciplinary standard, such as the Darwin Core standard for biodiversity information. Third, projects may design protocols based on a common, flexible data model. These later two approaches both allow machines to share data without human intervention. However, the use of disciplinary standards may limit data sharing with researchers outside of a particular domain. The goal of this symposium is to raise awareness of key considerations related to interoperability and the use of standards, as well as to share and discuss a range of practices related to interoperability in citizen science. Drawing on research and case studies, talks will address the following considerations: How do stakeholders within and beyond the CS community perceive data, interoperability, and standards? How might different community members be impacted by an initiative to promote CS standards? What are the benefits and challenges to implementing the various approaches toward interoperability? What are some successful case studies of interoperability and data sharing between citizen science projects? What can be learned from these experiences? 

PRESENTATIONS:

Advancing and mobilizing citizen science data through an integrated sustainable cyber-infrastructure
Russell Scarpino, CitSci.org, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University

Bridging discrepancies across North American butterfly naming authorities: Supporting citizen science data integration
Leslie Ries, Georgetown University

Citizen science data and metadata standardization across the globe: What are the issues for stakeholders?
Victoria Martin, Southern Cross University

Data Sharing and Visualization on Multiple Platforms: Citizen Science Connections for GLOBE Observer's Mobile App
Russanne Low, GLOBE Observer, IGES

SWE4CS: A data model to enhance reusability of citizen science observations
Ingo Simonis, Open Geospatial


Thursday May 18, 2017 10:00am - 11:00am
Meeting Rooms 2 & 3

10:00am

B-01: Symposium: Citizen Science across a spectrum
Citizen Science Across a Spectrum: Building Partnerships to Broaden the Impact of Citizen Science
Alison Parker - ORISE fellow hosted by the US Environmental Protection Agency
Citizen science and community science include a spectrum of efforts and projects, supported by various partnership structures and focused on widely varying outcomes that support environmental protection -- ranging from a pastor in El Paso, Texas using local knowledge of burials to indicate a cancer cluster to a bucket brigade in Tonawanda, NY providing the first set of data for EPA enforcement actions. Recent recommendations from the National Advisory Council on Environmental Policy and Technology to the US Environmental Protection Agency highlight a spectrum of opportunities associated with incorporating and supporting environmental citizen science. This symposium explores the role that partnerships play in increasing the impact of work across this spectrum of project outcomes from community engagement to regulatory action. This symposium outlines the many modes of citizen science, the people using citizen science and the methods for doing citizen science. Beyond research and peer-reviewed publications, what are the range of impacts that can come from a citizen science project? How can projects collaborate for maximum impact, from engaging communities all the way to enforcement action? How can different types of partnerships support identifying, collecting and using appropriate data and information towards different outcomes? During the panel and discussion, we will have opportunities for audience participation, including the opportunity to present additional projects and where they fall on the spectrum of citizen science outcomes.

PRESENTERS:

Civic monitoring with low-cost tools
Scott Eustis, Gulf Restoration Network

Community and Citizen Science Partnerships in Action
Shannon Dosemagen, Public Lab

Enabling Effective Environmental Decision Making in the Western Balkans via Citizen Science
Clayton Cox, AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow, US EPA

Environmental protection belongs to the public: A vision for citizen science at EPA
Alison Parker, ORISE fellow hosted by the US Environmental Protection Agency

Partnering for Action: A Co-Created Citizen Science Approach to Environmental Health Research in Underserved Communities
Monica Ramirez-Andreotta, University of Arizona

Real Science by Real People for Real Impact For All - Youth, Community, Environment, Non-Proftis, Industry and Government
Barb Horn, Colorado Parks and Wildlife 


Thursday May 18, 2017 10:00am - 11:00am
Meeting Rooms 4, 5 & 6

10:00am

C-01: Symposium: World Cafe: Which citizens have a moral responsibility to participate in science, and how can we tell when that responsibility has been fulfilled?
World Cafe: Which Citizens Have a Moral Responsibility to Participate in Science, and How Can We Tell When That Responsibility Has Been Fulfilled?
Organizer: Chris Santos-Lang - Citizen Science Belleville
Some people who balk at addressing world hunger and political conflict nonetheless reliably feed their own children and vote in major elections. That may be because family roles and voting rituals help clarify scope of moral responsibility. We might likewise enhance the dependability of citizen science by clarifying scope of moral responsibility: Who should do what, and how can we all tell? Facilitated by members of the CSA ethics working group, attendees of this "World Cafe" will collaboratively identify science which society collectively is morally obliged to conduct, and will identify ways to measure whether the requisite citizens have completed the requisite tasks.

This symposium is structured to collect contribution from credentialed and non-credentialed citizens alike. Each attendee will participate in several brainstorms, each with a different group of 4-5 other attendees. The brainstorms will be structured to build upon each other and to answer our research question. 

Thursday May 18, 2017 10:00am - 11:00am
Meeting Rooms 7, 8 & 9

10:00am

D-01: Symposium: Designing Collaborative Science Projects and Tools for Conservation
Designing Collaborative Science Projects and Tools for Conservation
Organizer: Steven Gray
Collaborative Science is a highly interactive form of science where the public engages with experts to address often locally-relevant scientific questions. Similar to 'co-created' citizen science projects, such collaborations have been shown to positively impact conservation outcomes. In this symposium, we bring together learning scientists, conservation ecologists, and information scientists involved in Collaborative Science projects to discuss cyber-enabled tools designed to engage citizen scientists in conservation, scientific processes, and adaptive resource management. The rationale for creating an online space for collaboration is to give interested participants the tools they need to create and sustain projects that are highly collaborative but require resources and expertise beyond a small spatial scope. In particular we provide an overview of web-based modeling, spatial analysis, and social media tools designed to engage citizen scientists in scientific research related to conservation issues. The goal of this session is to highlight the ways in which natural resource management outcomes can be achieved through participatory modeling and place-based geospatial analysis with citizen scientists with a particular focus on volunteer motivation, retention, and learning. The ultimate goal of this series of talks is to provide a discussion about how citizen science programs can be designed to support conservation goals and what evidence exists to support the notion that volunteers can influence conservation decision-making. The session will close with a panel discussion from the speakers about the challenges and opportunities for future investigation to address potential gaps between volunteer engagement, citizen science programs and conservation outcomes.

PRESENTATIONS:

Bridging the Benefits of Online and Community Supported Citizen Science: A Case study on Motivation and Retention with Conservation-Oriented Volunteers
Troy Frensley, Virginia Tech

Combining participatory modelling and citizen science to support volunteer conservation action
Steven Gray, Michigan State University

Conversations about Conservation: Seeing the impact of participation in citizen science projects on collaborative scientific practices.
Joey Huang, Indiana University

Studying citizen science through adaptive management and learning feedbacks as mechanisms for improving conservation
Rebecca Jordan, Rutgers University

Utilizing web-enabled geographic information systems to leverage the power of place in collaborative conservation science
John Gallo, Conservation Biology Institute


Thursday May 18, 2017 10:00am - 11:00am
Meeting Rooms 10, 11 & 12

10:00am

E-01: Symposium: Advancing our Global Understanding of Citizen Science Engagement through Cross Programmatic Research
Advancing Our Global Understanding of Citizen Science Engagement Through Cross Programmatic Research
Organizer: Tina Phillips
While there has been a surge in interdisciplinary research attempting to measure outcomes from citizen science, most studies rely on examinations of single projects, making it difficult to measure impacts across the field (Bonney et al. 2015, Phillips et al. 2012). In this session sponsored by the Research and Evaluation Working Group, we present four talks from across the globe, each describing cross programmatic research undertaken with at least two or more projects. The symposium will present research that describes individual engagement factors and patterns in both online and field-based citizen science projects. Each presentation will highlight research questions and constructs being examined across multiple projects, the various methods that can be employed to conduct this type of research, and the challenges and lessons learned when undertaking cross programmatic research. Findings from the presentations will advance our understanding of how people engage in different contexts, how learning might support recruitment and sustained participation, motivation for participating in citizen science, and factors that inhibit or enable participation. Synthesizing results across multiple projects also will provide insights for practitioners that can inform best practices for project design. Collectively, this information will further advance our understanding of impacts across the field of citizen science. We intend to present findings from the symposium in a CSA-sponsored blog.

PRESENTATIONS:

Environmental identity and citizen science
Nina James, University of South Australia

How Can We Maximize Learning in Citizen Science? A Mixed-Methods Study Examining the Influence of Different Project Activities on Learning Outcomes
Tina Phillips,  Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Cornell University

Short and Long-Term Engagement Among Volunteers in Human Computation Projects
Lesandro Ponciano, Federal University of Campina Grande, Brazil

Why is education important for Citizen Science? Learning as a factor supporting long-term participation in Online Citizen Science Projects.
Laure Kloetzer, University of Neuchâtel, Switzerland


Thursday May 18, 2017 10:00am - 11:00am
Meeting Rooms 13, 14 & 15

11:00am

Break
Thursday May 18, 2017 11:00am - 11:15am
N/A

11:15am

A-02: Name(s) Matter(s)
Are Citizen Science and Crowdsourcing the Same? An Investigation on the Role of Framing on Participant Outcomes
Amanda Sorensen* - Rutgers University; Rebecca Jordan - Rutgers University

If You Don't Call It Citizen Science, What Happens to Participation?
Rhiannon Crain* - Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Poppy McLeod - Cornell University; Janis Dickinson - Cornell University; Jonathon Schuldt - Cornell University; Hwansuck Song - Cornell University

Public Perceptions of Citizen Science
Karen Oberhauser* - University of Minnesota; Eva Lewandowski - Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources; Wendy Caldwell - University of Minnesota; Dane Elmquist - USDA-ARS

Why Cit Sci? Say What You Mean and Mean What You Say
Tiffany Beachy - Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont


Thursday May 18, 2017 11:15am - 12:15pm
Meeting Rooms 2 & 3

11:15am

B-02: Symposium: Waypoints of Science
Waypoints of Science: The Design, Development and Delivery of Citizen Science as Bonafide Science
Organizers: Julia Parrish; Jake Weltzin; Andrea Wiggins
Citizen science provides the promise of a rich, deep, authentic learning experience for everyone; a chance to engage in personally meaningful science; a chance for each of us to make a difference via participation. Why? Because an ultimate aim of citsci projects is the simultaneous creation of high quality information used in research and management as well as a cadre of science-savvy participants who can speak knowledgeably about the issues they investigate. While much recent work has been devoted to learner experiences in citizen science, relatively little work has critically examined how project design, development and delivery can make - or break - scientific outputs. Thus mainstream science remains largely skeptical of citsci as a bonafide science tool. Are the science concerns the same when a project has its first $10K or is aiming at its first paper, as when the $1M grant comes in or the 50th paper is out for review? Are issues similar for projects large in spatial extent, participant numbers or data scope relative to those that are smaller, or newer? What elements, structures and feedbacks are necessary? Where are the tipping points? Where are the cliffs? In this symposium, we examine the science in citizen science: foundational considerations needed to generate high quality science where scales of data match the issue/question addressed, new knowledge is generated, and/or information is directly applied to real world problem-solving. Presentations will be framed with two conceptual models presented in the introductory talk: project lifecycle and data tipping points.

PRESENTERS:

Approaches to Development and Delivery of High-Quality Data to Facilitate Science Outcome
Jake Weltzin, USA National Phenology Network and US Geological Survey

CoCoRaHS (Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network): Abundant Science from Citizen Science
Nolan Doesken, CoCoRaHS; Colorado State University

Filling in the Blanks: Pollinator Flight Paths Using The Great Sunflower Project Data
Gretchen Lebuhn, San Francisco State University

Framing the Conversation: A Citizen Science Research Lifecycle and Data Quality Tipping Points
Andrea Wiggins, University of Maryland

Guiding Principles for Success in Citizen Science from the Zooniverse
Brooke Simmons*, UC San Diego; Lucy Fortson, University of Minnesota

Monarchs + Milkweed + Volunteers = Data: The Great, the non-so Great, and the Clearly Ugly
Carl Stenoien*, University of Minnesota; Karen Oberhauser, University of Minnesota

Synthesis and Discussion 
Julia Parrish, COASST/University of Washington


Thursday May 18, 2017 11:15am - 12:15pm
Meeting Rooms 4, 5 & 6

11:15am

D-02: Symposium: Advancing Biomedical Research With Academic Research and Public Creativity
Advancing Biomedical Research with Academic Research and Public Creativity
Organizer: Danielle Daee - National Institutes of Health
Historically, incorporating citizen science methodologies into biomedical research has been challenging for a variety of reasons. Rather than highlight the challenges faced in biomedical citizen science projects, this panel will focus on the successes and high points. Several recent collaborations between citizen scientists and biomedical researchers have added to the growing evidence that citizen scientists can make valuable contributions within the biomedical framework and participate, not just as subjects of the research or advisors to the research, but also as partners in the research process itself. In this panel, we will highlight biomedical research projects that have utilized successful citizen science approaches to make unique and key contributions to the biomedical research efforts.

PRESENTATIONS:

A Case Study of Research Priority Setting with Community Input r improving conservation
Stuart Batterman*, Univeristy of Michigan; Guy Williams, Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice

A National Institutes of Health (NIH) Perspective on Citizen Science in Biomedical Research
Danielle Daee,  National Institutes of Health; Jennifer Couch

Foldit Case Study
Seth Cooper, Northeastern University

Mark2Cure Case Study
Ginger Tsueng, The Scripps Research Institute


Thursday May 18, 2017 11:15am - 12:15pm
Meeting Rooms 10, 11 & 12

11:15am

E-02: Community Empowerment
From Stewardship to Citizen Science: A Closer Look at the Learning Trajectories of Volunteers in an Environmental Education and Stewardship Program
Jennifer Preece* - University of Maryland; Tamara Clegg - University of Maryland, College Park; Carol Boston - University of Maryland; Daniel Pauw - University of Maryland, College of Information Studies; Elizabeth Warrick - University of Maryland, College Park

Science in Transformation: Stories of Interdisciplinarity and Public Engagement
Amy Lesen - Tulane University

Stream Stewards: Using Citizen Science as Part of an Adaptive Management Strategy to Engage Committed Volunteers in Watershed Stewardship
Kim Hachadoorian - The Nature Conservancy

'They Really Appreciate Me Here': Citizen-Expert Collaboration and Interaction in Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring
Jaime McCauley - Coastal Carolina University


Thursday May 18, 2017 11:15am - 12:15pm
Meeting Rooms 13, 14 & 15

11:30am

C-02: Big Ideas From the Global Context
Comparison of Marine Debris Data Collected by Researchers and Citizen Scientists: Is Citizen Science Data Worth the Effort?
Tonya van der Velde 

Overview of the European Research Landscape on Citizen Science

Katrin Vohland* - Museum fr Naturkunde Berlin, Leibniz Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity Research

Citizen Science in the Karoo:Tool for Community Engagement
Nyaradzo Dhliwayo - Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University 


Thursday May 18, 2017 11:30am - 12:15pm
Meeting Rooms 7, 8 & 9

12:15pm

Lunch & Poster Session #1
Posters will be available for viewing from 7:00am Thursday - 7:30pm Friday. There will be two Poster Sessions during the main conference: Poster Session #1 (P1) will be on Thursday from 12:45pm – 1:45pm; and Poster Session #2 (P2) on Friday from 1:00pm – 2:00pm. The following authors will stand by their posters during P1:

How Illinois RiverWatch Physical and Biological Stream Data Are Used to Conserve Streams
Matthew Young - The National Great Rivers Research & Education Center

Citizen Science (In the Garden!): Engaging Extension Master Gardeners in Research
Brooke Edmunds - Oregon State University Extension

Citizen SciGirls: Transmedia and Research to Encourage Girls in STEM
Sarah Carter - SciGirls/Twin Cities PBS

Educating & Energizing Volunteers by Measuring D.C.'s Trees
Arielle Conti - Casey Trees

Bringing Citizen Science into the Backcountry: Emerging Best Practices to Engage Outdoor...
Anya Tyson - University of Vermont

From Growing Season to Fire Season: When the California Phenology Project Met Wildfire
Alexandra Weill - University of California, Davis

Contribution of Citizen Science and Community Based Monitoring Towards International Biodiversity Monitoring
Mark Chandler - Earthwatch Institute

Citizen Science and Community Engagement in Our National Parks
Kris Barnes - National Park Service - Biological Resources Division

Eels as Educators: Engaging Minority Students in Environmental Science Through Participation in...
Rhea Esposito - Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

Chesapeake Monitoring Cooperative: Building an Interstate Water Monitoring Cooperative
Lea Rubin - Izaak Walton League of America

Citizen Science Monitoring of Marine Protected Areas: Case Studies and Recommendations for...
Jan Freiwald - Reef Check California

Citizens for the Control of Biological Invasions: Engaging Through Game-based Training, Checking Through eDNA
Eduardo Dopico - University of Oviedo

20 Years of Evaluation of the Iowater Monitoring Program
Mary Skopec - Iowa Lakeside Laboratory

Cochrane Crowd and Cochrane Classmate: Learning by Doing in a Win-Win Innovation for Evidence-based Medicine
Susanna Wisniewski - Cochrane Dementia & Cognitive Improvement Group

Fostering Collaboration Among Biology, Environmental Studies, and Teacher Education Undergraduates Through...
Colleen Hitchcock - Brandeis University

Happywhale: Give Us Your Whale Photos and We'll Make You Part of the Story - Using Cit Sci to Describe Global Whale Populations
Ted Cheeseman - Happywhale

Contributions to Publications and Management Plans from 7 Years of Citizen Science...
Stan Rullman - Earthwatch Institute

Assessing and Improving Citizen Science Data Quality in Biological Surveys: Insights Synthesized Across...
Hannah Specht - University of Minnesota

Engaging English Language Arts and Science Teachers in Fostering Students' Civic Engagement for Addressing Climate Change
Richard Beach - University of Minnesota

Bat Power - How Teamwork and Community Engagement Are Helping the Florida Bonneted Bat
Brendan O'Connor - Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission

A Citizen Science Approach to Biomedical Literature Mining and Biocuration
Ginger Tsueng - The Scripps Research Institute

“Counting Fish Is My Yoga": Evaluating the Social and Educational Impacts of a River Herring Citizen...
Meghna Marjadi - Ohio State University

Citizen Science as a Strategy to Grow Public Engagement in Conservation
Sharon Tatem - Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission

Bioretention Ponds and Basins as 'Natural Areas' and Sources for Citizen Science
Jeffrey Depew - Webster University and EarthDesigns

Collaboratively Sharing Citizen Science and Traditional Science Data in an Open and Sustainable Online Environment
Yurong He - University of Maryland

Fishing the European Citizen Science Diversity
Susanne Hecker - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research/German Centre for integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

Co-created Practice in Citizen Science: Lessons Learned from Other Disciplines
Jade Cawthray-Syms - University of Dundee

Combining Citizen Science and Traditional Remote Sensing Techniques for Flood Disaster Response
Avinoam Baruch - Loughborough University

Evaluating Science Outcomes in Citizen Science
Jonathan Brier - University of Maryland

Caller ID: How to Engage Citizen Scientists with Bioacoustics to Find an Elusive Australian Bird
Jessie Cappadonna - Queensland University of Technology

CrowdWater
Barbara Strobl - University of Zurich

Citizen Scientists Influencing Forest Invasive Species Management in Minnesota
Dawn Littleton - University of Minnesota Extension

Wasp Watchers: Collaborative EAB Biosurveillance
Jennifer Schultz - University of Minnesota Extension

Development and Implementation of Relatable Citizen Science Programs to Engage and Empower Diverse Audiences to...
Curtis Bennett - National Aquarium

Data Quality in Citizen Science: Applying Technology to Assess and Analyze Volunteer Participation in...
Cassandra Davis - Aquarium of the Pacific

CitSciScribe: Meeting the Needs of Natural History Collections One Transcription at a Time
Gabriela Hogue - North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

Camera Traps in the Classroom: Creating Authentic Learning Opportunities for Students While Gathering Valuable...
Rachael Polmanteer - Wake Forest Middle School

Following the Pathways of Plastic Litter - What`s the Impact on K-12 Students` Environmental Awareness and...
Katrin Kruse - Kiel University

GLOBE Observer: Bridging Students, Scientists, and Citizens
Kristen Weaver - SSAI, Inc./NASA Earth Science Education Collaborative

Citizen Science Along Urban-wild Gradients to Study Animal Adaptation in the Anthropocene
Roland Kays - North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences & NC State University

Gardenroots: Building a Culture of Health in the Green Through Environmental Public Health Citizen Science
Monica Ramirez-Andreotta - University of Arizona

Candid Critters State Wide Citizen Science Camera Trap Project
Roland Kays - North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences & NC State University

Benefits and Setbacks of Adopting Sensor Technologies in Volunteer Monitoring
Arielle Gerstein - Environmental Protection Agency

Environmental and Social Justice Investigations Featuring Citizen Science Data
Rebecca Boger - Brooklyn College

Aurorasaurus - Three Examples of Blurring Disciplines Across Space Science Through Public Participation
Elizabeth MacDonald - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Citizen Science, Environmental Outreach and Water Quality
Ibrahim Goodwin - US EPA

How Is Citizen Science Organized?
Claudia Goebel - European Citizen Science Association

Age and Gender Representation in BikeMaps.org
Colin Ferster - University of Victoria

Building the SciBridge Between Africa and the U.S
Christopher Boggs - North Carolina State University

Building Environmental Intelligence: Solutions to Barriers in Monitoring Program Integration
Peter Tango - USGS

Evaluation of a Long-term Volunteer Stream Monitoring Program to Insure a Sustainable Future
Peggy Compton - University of Wisconsin-Extension

Voluntourism or Real Science? Ethics and Challenges on Volunteer Field Expeditions on Citizen Science Projects
Sandro Von Matter - Federal Rural University of Rio

Beyond Monitoring: Expanding the Role of Citizen Science in Pollinator Conservation
Susan Carpenter - University of Wisconsin-Madison Arboretum

Embracing Citizen Science as a Federal Agency
Rachael Graham

"Get 'em Explorin' While They're Young": Training the Next Generation of Citizen Scientists from Educators' Perspectives
Aerin Benavides - University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Comparing Estimates by Citizen Scientists and Professionals: Owl Limpet Sizes and Sea Star Abundances in...
Emily Gottlieb - Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History

Globe at Night: Many Hands Make Light Work
Constance Walker - National Optical Astronomy Observatory

A Year of Project Evaluation: Using the Port Townsend Marine Science Center Rubric at the Natural...
Richard Smart - Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Creating a Science Team: Learning, Motivation, and Identity in COASST
Erika Frost - COASST/University of Washington

Laying the Groundwork for Effective Citizen Science Collaborations in Management Contexts
Jennifer Shirk - Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Exploring Citizen Science and Learning Through iSpotnature.org
Janice Ansine - The Open University

Citizen sciences as reflexive, contextual social movements
Priya Vallabh - Rhodes University

Master Naturalist Programs and Citizen Science - A Natural Match
Sabrina Drill - University of Californa Cooperative Extension

Enhancing Scientific Literacy Through Citizen Science
Zoe Nelson - University of Wyoming

Charismatic Mini-fauna Connect Citizen Scientists to Air and Water Pollution Issues in National Parks...
Sarah Nelson - University of Maine

Tourist Science in Denali National Park and Preserve
Heather Fischer - Arizona State University

Project CRYSTAL: How Do We Restore Our State Park?
Jennifer Long - Center for Environmental Biology

The Island County Marine Resources Committee’s citizen science activities
Barbara Bennett, Island County Marine Resources Committee

Partners for Impact
Rick Bonney...


Thursday May 18, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Ballroom

12:30pm

1:15pm

Speaker Ready Room
Thursday May 18, 2017 1:15pm - 5:00pm
Meeting Room 1

1:45pm

A-03: Are Decisions Being Made with the Data we Collect?
Citizen Science for Decision Making. Utopia or Reality?: An Approach from the Córdoba Wetland 
Karen Soacha - Instituto Alexander von Humboldt

Community Science Enhances and Engenders Civic Participation 
Gretchen Gehrke* - Public Lab; Shannon Dosemagen - Public Lab; Liz Barry - Public Lab; Mathew Lippincott - Public Lab; Stevie Lewis - Public Lab

Dead Birds, Data & Decision-Making: How Resource Managers Use the COASST Project to Inform Management & Policy
Jennifer Metes* - University of California, Davis; Heidi Ballard - University of California, Davis; Julia Parrish - COASST/University of Washington

Is Citizen Science Informing Water Policy in Canada?: From Data Legitimacy to Policy Integration
Tyler Carlson* - Simon Fraser University; Alice Cohen - Acadia University


Thursday May 18, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Meeting Rooms 2 & 3

1:45pm

B-03: Things Come Together
Incorporating Citizen Science into a "Traditional" Research Project: Managing the Transition
Jessica Hubbard* - Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC); Alison Cawood* - Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC); Maria Sharova - Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC)

Barriers and strategies to accelerate the use of citizen science by government agencies

Danah Duke, Executive Director, Miistakis Institute, Krista Tremblett, Indigenous and Citizen Science Program Lead, Environmental Monitoring, Alberta Environment and Parks

Empowering Group Leaders with Real-time Data on Participation and Data Quality
Erin Posthumus - USA National Phenology Network

Studying the Use of Animations for Educating CoCoRaHS Volunteers
Noah Newman* – CoCoRaHS; Victor van den Bergh - Goodman Research Group, Inc.


Thursday May 18, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Meeting Rooms 4, 5 & 6

1:45pm

C-03: Understanding Who Participates
Mapping Diversity in Citizen Science Participation in the Northeastern US
Erika Barthelmess* - St. Lawrence University; Jacob Malcomb - Nature Up North / St. Lawrence University

Better Together: Finding Common Ground Between Citizen and Scientist
Anne-Marie Runfola - NOAA/Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary

Braiding Citizen Science, Culturally Responsive and Locally Relevant Learning Through Arctic and Earth SIGNs
Elena Sparrow* - The International Arctic Research Center/School of Natural Resources and Extension at the University of Alaska Fairbanks; Katie Spellman - University of Alaska Fairbanks International Arctic Research Center

Initial Motivations for Participation in Wildlife Monitoring on Private Land
Christine Anhalt-Depies* - University of Wisconsin-Madison; Adena Rissman - University of Wisconsin-Madison; Mark Rickenbach - University of Wisconsin-Madison; Jennifer Stenglein - Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources


Thursday May 18, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Meeting Rooms 7, 8 & 9

1:45pm

D-03: Symposium: The Emerging Whole: Putting Citizen Science in Place
The Emerging Whole: Putting Citizen Science in Place
Organizer: Mary Ellen Hannibal
As the ecological crisis critically imperils biodiversity, citizen science (CS) posits a platform for addressing it at local to global scales. But while projects proliferate, actual conservation outcomes from CS are lagging or inadequate . Why? What's missing? How do we bridge the divide between science and action? The statistical and modeling rigor of Big Data are often referenced as the "science" CS, but its specialized rationales can separate it from local relevance. Academic attention to participant experience excavates the "citizen," yet its focus on the personal often stops short of supporting more powerful collective, landscape-level impacts. Mary Ellen Hannibal will moderate a discussion of where large-scale data collection and analysis and individual experience come together on local landscapes. Allen Fish of the Golden Gate Raptor Observatory and Julia Parrish of the Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team will talk about managing hundreds of volunteers over decades, not only furnishing data and research themselves but fostering others to do the same. We will articulate "place" as the meeting ground for the dichotomous end points of "citizen" and "science," and the gateway for conservation outcomes.

PRESENTATIONS:

Sense of Place and Collective Identity in the COASST Program
Julia Parrish, COASST/University of Washington

The Emerging Whole: Putting Citizen Science in its Place
Mary Ellen Hannibal

Thirty Years of Raptor Monitoring: Conservation Impacts
Allen Fish, Golden Gate Raptor Observatory, Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy


Thursday May 18, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Meeting Rooms 10, 11 & 12

1:45pm

E-03: Engaging Students in Rich Science Experiences
"Mosquitoes & Me Rocks the House": Youth Entomology in the Urban Ecosystem
Katherine Richardson Bruna* - Iowa State University; Lyric Bartholomay - University of Madison at Wisconsin; Gale Seiler - Iowa State University

DNA Barcoding: Engaging Students in Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics Through Authentic Biodiversity Research
Bruce Nash* - Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory; Sharon Pepenella - Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory; Cristina Fernandez-Marco - Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory; Christine Marizzi - Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory; Dave Micklos - Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Dragonfly Detectives: Engaging 4th-8th Graders in Authentic Science in the Field
Christine Goforth - North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

Start Them Early! Get Elementary Students Involved in Studying Climate Using a Module Storybook and Learning Activities from the GLOBE Program
John McLaughlin - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); Sarah McCrea - NASA


Thursday May 18, 2017 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Meeting Rooms 13, 14 & 15

2:45pm

Coffee Break
Thursday May 18, 2017 2:45pm - 3:00pm
Ballroom Concourse

3:00pm

A-04: Empowering Communities with Aquatic Data Collection
Empowering Communities to Contribute to Flood Risk Management Policy Through Citizen Science
Avinoam Baruch* - Loughborough University; Dapeng Yu - Loughborough University; Andrew May - Loughborough University

Aquatic Citizen Science: A Sound Investment
Julie Vastine* - Alliance for Aquatic Resource Monitoring

FreshWater Watch: Lessons and Outcomes from a Global Citizen Science Program
Ian Thornhill* - Earthwatch Instutute; Steven Loiselle - Earthwatch Instutute; Diana Eddowes - Earthwatch Institute; Rita Galdos - Earthwatch Institute

Using Volunteer Data to Improve Stream Health
Jeri Fleming - Oklahoma Conservation Commission


Thursday May 18, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Meeting Rooms 2 & 3

3:00pm

B-04: Creative Mechanisms for Engaging People
Citizen Environmental Science and Science Education
Dixon Butler - Butler Consulting; Darlene Cavalier - SciStarter; Jennifer Hammonds - National WildlifeFederation Eco-Schools USA Program; Tony Murphy - The GLOBE Implementation Office; Sheri Potter -SciStarter

Citizen Science as a Springboard in the Practice of Science and Developing Scientific Explanations with Independent Student Directed Science Fair Projects
Michele Koomen - Gustavus Adolphus College; Elizabeth Schutz - Clear Springs Elementary School; AlissaHoffman - Gustavus Adolphus College; Cindy Peterson - St. Hubert School

How to Raise a New Generation of Citizen Scientists and Environmental Stewards in 7 Easy Steps
Laura Herszenhorn - California Academy of Sciences

Hack Days and ThinkCamps for Citizen Science
Margaret Gold - Natural History Museum London


Thursday May 18, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Meeting Rooms 4, 5 & 6

3:00pm

C-04: Issues Around Health Data
Bringing People's (Sensitive) Data Back to the People: Privacy, Ownership, Accessibility, and Fitness-for-Use of VGI in the Context of Public Health
John Palmer* - Universitat Pompeu Fabra; Aitana Oltra - CREAF; Jaume Piera - ICM-CSIC; Frederic Bartumeus - Centre d'Estudis Avançats de Blanes

Citizen Science in Disasters, Exposure Assessment, and Public Health
April Bennett* - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Aubrey Miller - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Liam O'Fallon - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; Chip Hughes - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Enabling Personal Health Data Donation for Public Good Research
Cinnamon Bloss - UC San Diego; Cynthia Cheung - UC San Diego; Matthew Bietz* - UC Irvine; Kevin Patrick - UC San Diego

Public Engagement in Extraction Transparency: Sharing Knowledge Through the FracTracker Alliance
Kirk Jalbert* - FracTracker Alliance; Samantha Rubright - FracTracker Alliance; Karen Edelstein - FracTracker Alliance


Thursday May 18, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Meeting Rooms 7, 8 & 9

3:00pm

D-04: Tools for People Running Projects
Breaking the Barriers to Citizen Science
Artemis Skarlatidou* - University College London; Alice Sheppard - University College London; Muki Haklay - University College London; Claudia Goebel - European Citizen Science Association

Citizen Science and Open Hardware: Creating a Roadmap for Accessible Technology Innovation
Shannon Dosemagen* - Public Lab; François Grey - University of Geneva; Jenny Molloy - University of Cambridge

What We Learned from Talking to 110 People About Citizen Science Tools: Scaling and Sustaining Through the NSF Innovation Corps for Learning Program
Micah Lande - Arizona State University; Darlene Cavalier* - Arizona State University, School for the Future of Innovation in Society; Brianne Fisher - ; David Sittenfeld - ; Erica Prange - SciStarter and the Cleveland Museum of Natural History; Catherine Hoffman - SciStarter

Getting It Right or Being Top Rank: Games in Citizen Science
Marisa Ponti*  - University of Gothenburg; Thomas Hillman - University of Gothenburg; Christopher Kullenberg - University of Gothenburg; Dick Kasperowski - University of Gothenburg


Thursday May 18, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Meeting Rooms 10, 11 & 12

3:00pm

E-04: Winning Over Educators by Supporting Them
Using Schoolyard Bioblitzes and Open Science Resources to Build Scientific Skills and Understanding of the Nature of Science for Classroom Learning
Amy Lorenz - Encyclopedia of Life / Harvard University

Engaging and Supporting Teachers in Curriculum-Based Citizen Science
Sara Ludovise - Crystal Cove Alliance

Enlisting Formal Educators as Partners in Conservation
Judith Hutton* - New York Botanical Garden; Candyce Johnson - Brooklyn Botanic Garden

Teaching with Citizen Science: An Exploratory Study of Teachers' Motivations and Perceptions
Georgia Bracey - University of Missouri - St. Louis


Thursday May 18, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Meeting Rooms 13, 14 & 15

3:00pm

Roundtables: Tools for Citizen Science
Come learn about a variety of digital tools that have been designed to support citizen science projects -- from apps to cyber-infrastructure. 

PRESENTATIONS:

Communicating Citizen Science Projects and Results with Apps to Inspire

Charmel Menzel - Esri

Advancing and Mobilizing Citizen Science Data Through an Integrated Sustainable Cyber-Infrastructure
Russell Scarpino - CitSci.org, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University

The Citizen Science Lab at Leiden University
Anne Land-Zandstra - Leiden University

SWE4CS: A Data Model to Enhance Reusability of Citizen Science Observations
Ingo Simonis - OGC

Cartoscope: A New Platform for Citizen Science and Disaster Response
Sofia Eleni Spatharioti - Northeastern University

DIY Your Crowdsourced Research Project Site Using the Free Zooniverse Project Builder
Laura Trouille - Adler Planetarium

Science Game Lab: On Creating a Central Hub for the Intersection of Games and Citizen Science
Ginger Tsueng - Science Game Lab

Monitoring Water Clarity and Cyanobacterial Blooms with Lake Observer: A Mobile App for Collection of Lake Data by Citizen Scientists
Holly Ewing - Bates College

Closing the 'Data Gap': Using Big Data to Facilitate Analysis by Citizen Scientists
Duncan Bailey - MDI Biological Laboratory

Ethical Considerations in Developing the CitSci.org Citizen Science Platform
Stacy Lynn - CitSci.org; Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory; Colorado State University

Using SalesForce to Build a Volunteer Force: Lessons and Best Practices
Victoria Ortiz - Adventure Scientists

A Platform to Conduct Collective Experimentation in Open Scenarios
Julian Vicens - Universitat Rovira i Virgili

From Citizen Science to Consulting: Stumbling into a Market for Your Project
Jon Van Oast - Wild Me

Water Reporter - Experience, Capture, Share
John Dawes - Chesapeake Commons

WikiWatershed(R) toolkit for supporting watershed science and management
Anthony Aufdenkampe, Ph.D. - Limno Tech

NE Ohio ParkApps: Development of a mobile app as a method of encouraging informal science learning
Julia M. Geschke - Cleveland Metroparks 

Natusfera, a Citizen Science Platform to Empower Local Collectives for Environmental Monitoring
Jaume Piera - ICM-CSIC


Thursday May 18, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Ballroom

4:00pm

Break
Thursday May 18, 2017 4:00pm - 4:15pm
N/A

4:15pm

A-05: The Power of Place
Bringing Data to Decisionmakers: Building Capacity Among Citizen-initiated Efforts
Pam DiBona* - Massachusetts Bays National Estuary Program; Prassede Vella - Massachusetts Bays National Estuary Program; Nicholas Moreno - Massachusetts Bays National Estuary Program

Toward a Definition of Indigenous Citizen Science in Kenya
Elizabeth Warrick* - University of Maryland, College Park.; Tamara Clegg - University of Maryland, College Park; Jennifer Preece - University of Maryland; Jedidah Kibutu - Chuka University

Understanding the Role of Place in Citizen Science and Conservation Decision Making
Greg Newman* - Colorado State University; Mark Chandler - Earthwatch Institute; Malin Clyde - University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension; Bridie McGreavy - University of Maine; Muki Haklay - University College London; Heidi Ballard - University of California, Davis; Steven Gray - Michigan State University; Russell Scarpino - CitSci.org, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University

Blurring the Boundaries Between Outdoor and Online Citizen Science: Lessons Learned from the Orchid Observers Project
John Tweddle* - Natural History Museum London; Lucy Robinson - Natural History Museum London; Heidi Ballard - University of California, Davis; Chris Lintott - University of Oxford


Thursday May 18, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Meeting Rooms 2 & 3

4:15pm

B-05: Symposium: The Integrity, Diversity and Equity (IDE) Working Group
The Integrity, Diversity and Equity (IDE) Working Group: Progress Report and Discussions for Ensuring Equity and Justice Within the CSA
Organizer: Daniela Soleri
The Integrity, Diversity and Equity (IDE) Working Group of the CSA was founded to "take responsibility for including justice, equity and integrity in scientific research among the founding and guiding mandates of our association. We also work with colleagues within and beyond our association to support and advance those mandates in practice." Through clarity, a willingness to make values explicit, and recognition of structural and historical sources of inequity in communities and academic and other professional scientific organizations, our goal is to support citizen science practice that is positive for society. In this symposium IDE members giving short presentations, and many more members who will be present, will discuss our work to date including guidance on language and processes for the association in general, extensive involvement with the CSA 2017 conference planning process, a series of issues statements defining critical concepts for equitable partnerships, and collaborating with other working groups. During the open discussion we will elaborate further on this work, but especially provide space for attendees with their own ideas for accomplishing this goal. Suggestions and critiques will be summarized as a group process at the end of the symposium, posted on the IDE webpage and responded to by IDE over the summer, also to be posted.

PRESENTATIONS:

Examples of IDE issues, Knowledge and expertise: Oralite trackers and scientific reasoning - towards an inclusive citizen science.
Louis Liebenberg, CyberTracker

Passion, process and practice: The ongoing evolution of the Integrity, Diversity and Equity working group
Daniela Soleri*,  UC Santa Barbara; Timothy Vargo, Urban Ecology Center; Shannon Dosemagen, Public Lab

The Integrity, Diversity and Equity Working Group: Identifying and Tackling Obstacles to Participating in Citizen Science.
Linda Silka, University of Maine-Orono


Thursday May 18, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Meeting Rooms 4, 5 & 6

4:15pm

C-05: Breaking Down Walls to Science Practice
Advancing Open-Access Science Education Through Responsible Citizen Science Journalism
Kate Stone - Science Connected

The Challenges of Being a Citizen Researcher ('Uh, Who Are You Exactly and Who Are You With???')
Ed Harris - Scleroderma Education Project Ltd

Citizen Science - Innovation in Open Science, Society and Policy
Aletta Bonn* - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research/ German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig; Muki Haklay - University College London; Susanne Hecker - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research/German Centre for integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig; Anne Bowser - Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Zen Makuch - Imperial College London, UK; Johannes Vogel - Museum fr Naturkunde Berlin; Roger Owen - Scotish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA)


Thursday May 18, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Meeting Rooms 7, 8 & 9

4:15pm

D-05: Symposium: Professional development and curricular resources
Professional Development and Curricular Resources: What Approaches Best Support K-12 Teachers in Facilitating Student Inquiry Through Citizen Science?
Organizer: Nancy Trautmann
Implementation of citizen science in school settings offers potential rewards to students, teachers, and scientists. Related lesson plans are proliferating, and increasing numbers of projects are holding workshops for teachers. In spite of these resources and opportunities, many teachers are not yet aware of the potential offered by citizen science or do not feel prepared to facilitate participation by their students. When K-12 students do engage in citizen science, their involvement often is limited to data collection. As a result, they miss out on opportunities to pose research questions, engage in scientific argument, analyze data, and interpret results within the context of data collected by others. This symposium will address three key questions addressing these challenges: 1) How can we inspire teachers to engage their students in citizen science? 2) What types of curricular resources and professional development opportunities are proving effective in helping teachers to involve their students in the full range of science practices rather than stopping with data collection? and 3) What challenges remain that we can address across the field? A panel of five educators representing a diverse range of approaches will share experiences related to these three questions. Emphasis will be placed on insights and lessons learned for use by people interested in creating new curriculum and professional development opportunities, or in selecting from among those that already exist. The session will conclude with a discussion focusing on challenges, opportunities, and questions worthy of investigation by both practitioners and researchers.

PRESENTATIONS:

Citizen Science Provides Context for K-12 Science Investigations – Insights from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's BirdSleuth Program
Jennifer Fee, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Curating and Co-creating Citizen Science Lesson Plans -- Insights from North Carolina State University's Students Discover Project
Leonora Shell, StudentsDiscover.org - Your Wild Life - North Carolina State University

Curriculum, Professional Development, and Citizen Science Woven Together to Support Teachers and Students - Insights from the Gulf of Maine Research Institute's Vital Signs program
Christine Voyer, Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Fostering Meaningful Dialogue in Student-Teacher-Scientist Research Partnerships -  Insights from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
Cat Stylinski, Appalachian Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Three Steps to Using Citizen Science as a Springboard for Classroom Investigations: Insights from the University of Minnesota's Driven to Discover Program
Sarah Weaver, University of Minnesota


Thursday May 18, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Meeting Rooms 10, 11 & 12

4:15pm

E-05: Participant Engagement and Retention
Exploring the Goals and Motivations of Citizen Scientists in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Suzanne Spitzer* - University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science; Caroline Donovan - University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science; William Dennison - University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Instant-gratification Citizen Science
Luigi Ceccaroni* - 1000001 Labs; Anne Bowser - Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars; Jaume Piera - ICM-CSIC

Quantitative Predictors of Participant Retention: Survival Analysis of the CoCoRaHS Dataset
S. Andrew Sheppard - University of Minnesota


Thursday May 18, 2017 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Meeting Rooms 13, 14 & 15

5:00pm

Citizen SciGirls Happy Hour & PBS Screening Event (separate registration; see details)
Screening of Citizen SciGirls media, with comments by Executive Producer, Dr. Richard Hudson. Enjoy a quick walk along the lovely Mississippi from the RiverCentre to Twin Cities PBS studios, where we’re gathering for cold drinks and HOT citizen science with SciGirls! You’ll enjoy innovative, engaging and fun media from SciGirls’ recent citizen science-themed season. From their own backyards to a NASA research center and beyond, the real and relatable SciGirls tracked toads, counted clouds, monitored monarchs’ metamorphoses and much more, all in the name of citizen science!

Location: Twin Cities PBS, 172 East 4th Street, St. Paul MNThis event is sponsored by: SciGirls and Twin Cities Public Television

Sponsored by: SciGirls

SEPARATE REGISTRATION - TO SIGN UP, GO TO: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/citizen-scigirls-happy-hour-and-pbs-screening-event-tickets-32173501810

Thursday May 18, 2017 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Offsite: Twin Cities PBS Studios 172 East 4th Street, St. Paul, MN

5:15pm

5:15pm

5:30pm

Project Slam!
Join us at 5:30 PM in the Ballroom for a fun and fast-paced way to learn about and welcome some of the “new kids” in the citizen science world. Listen to quick – and competitive! – five-minute presentations about these new projects and project approaches – the audience will help determine the “Peoples’ Choice Award” and choose the top presentations to be shared with the public during Friday evening’s reception. Come ready to celebrate these new initiatives, and to cheer for your favorites! Cash bar and light snacks provided. 

PRESENTATIONS:

Sparrow Swap

Caren Cooper - North Carolina State University and SciStarter

NatureNet
Carol Boston - University of Maryland

Learning to See, Seeing to Learn: Designing Macroinvertebrates.org
Marti Louw - Carnegie Mellon University

Snapshot Safari
Meredith Palmer - University of Minnesota

The Chesapeake Monitoring Cooperative
Alexandra Fries - University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Doing-it-Together Science: Amplifying & Cross-Pollinating Citizen & DIY Science in Europe
Claudia Goebel - European Citizen Science Association

Habitat Network
Megan Whatton - The Nature Conservancy

Mark2Cure: Learn, Work, Help
Max Nanis - The Scripps Research Institute

Guardians of Chapada Monitoring Pollinators in Brazil
Blandina Viana - Biology Institute - Federal University of Bahia (UFBA)

The Smartfin: How Citizen Scientist Surfers Could Help Inform Coastal Ocean Science and Conservation
Shannon Waters - Surfrider Foundation

ScienceCache: a Geocaching Framework for Repeated Observations
Tab Graves - U.S. Geological Survey, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

Volunteers and drones combine to map invasive plant species along major rivers in Tokyo, Japan
Hiromi Kobori - Tokyo City University

Floodcrowd: Sharing Observations of Floods to Help Research Their Causes and What We Can Do About Them
Avinoam Baruch - Loughborough University

GLOBE Observers (GO) Mosquito
Rebecca Boger - Brooklyn College

Biscayne Bay Drift Card Project (BayDrift)
Chelle King - Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science

City Nature Challenge
Alison Young - California Academy of Sciences

Monitoring Bird Windows Collision in South America: Common Challenges and Perspectives for CitSci Projects
Sandro Von Matter - Federal Rural University of Rio

Aurorasaurus
Elizabeth MacDonald - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center


Thursday May 18, 2017 5:30pm - 7:00pm
Ballroom
 
Friday, May 19
 

7:00am

Featured Event: CSA Business Meeting and Breakfast (open to all!)
An opportunity to take the pusle of the Citizen Science Association's organizational development and be a voice for shaping its future. 

Friday May 19, 2017 7:00am - 8:00am
Ballroom

7:00am

Speaker Ready Room
Friday May 19, 2017 7:00am - 11:15am
Meeting Room 1

7:30am

8:00am

Keynote Presentation: Dr. Ellen Jorgensen, Co-Founder, Executive Director of Genspace, a community biolab
Dr. Ellen Jorgensen is co-founder and Executive Director of Genspace, a community biolab. She is passionate about science literacy in both student and adult populations, particularly in molecular and synthetic biology. In 2011 she initiated Genspace’s award-winning curriculum of informal science education for adults in biotechnology and synthetic biology. Ellen has a Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from New York University, spent many years in the biotechnology industry, and is currently adjunct faculty at New York Medical College, the School of Visual Arts, and a Visiting Professor at The Cooper Union. She is @FeyScientist on Twitter.

Keynote Speakers
avatar for Dr. Ellen Jorgensen

Dr. Ellen Jorgensen

Genspace
Dr. Ellen Jorgensen is co-founder and Executive Director of Genspace, a community biolab. She is passionate about science literacy in both student and adult populations, particularly in molecular and synthetic biology. In 2011 she initiated Genspace’s award-winning curriculum of... Read More →



Friday May 19, 2017 8:00am - 8:45am
Ballroom

9:00am

A-06: Data Collection: Reflecting on What Makes a Dataset Robust
Challenges and Solutions in Obtaining Robust Observational Data at National Scales from a (potentially) Untrained Public: The Case Study of Redmap Australia
Victoria Martin* - Southern Cross University; Gretta Pecl - Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies; Jemina Stuart-Smith - IMAS; Gary Jackson - WA Fisheries; Peter Walsh - IMAS; Natalie Moltschaniwskyj - NSW DPI

Data Sharing and Visualization on Multiple Platforms: GLOBE Observer's Mobile Mosquito App
Russsanne Low* - Institute for Global Environmental Strategies; Rebecca Boger - Brooklyn College; Amy Myrbo - University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Reed McEwan - University of Minnesota, Twin Cities; Roller Angel - The GLOBE Program

Tradeoffs Bridging Local and Global Scale Citizen-science - Lessons from INaturalist
Scott Loarie* - California Academy of Sciences

Can Citizens Observe What Models Need? an Approach for the Evaluation of the Potential Value of Crowd-based Observations in Hydrology
Simon Etter* - University of Zurich - Department of Geography; Barbara Strobl - University of Zurich


Friday May 19, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Meeting Rooms 2 & 3

9:00am

B-06: Symposium: One Billion Wildlife Observations: Crowdsourcing Digital Collections
One Billion Wildlife Observations: Crowdsourcing Digital Collections
Organizer: Lucy Robinson
Natural sciences collections around the world comprise more than one billion specimens, representing a vast source of information on the natural world. Natural History Museums and similar institutions hold and care for these collections on behalf of us all - they are an international public resource. Mobilising these data for research, conservation and public use is a formidable task - and one that is ideally suited to citizen science. Using the power of the crowd to extract, transcribe, interpret and/or analyse data from handwritten labels brings the scale of the task within reach within our lifetimes. This symposium brings together international examples of crowdsourcing platforms, and highlights practical tools and advice for setting up and running a crowdsourcing project. We share innovative ideas for engaging broad global audiences in this endeavour and tips for supporting and nurturing an online community of citizen scientists including the similarities and differences to face-to-face engagement and training. Crowdsourcing by its nature is a big data movement, and we will demonstrate existing tools and new ones under development that can facilitate open data sharing and the onward use of data for education, conservation and ongoing research. Finally, such a task doesn't come without significant challenges and opportunities! We share our lessons learned, highlight issues we are still facing and invite suggestions and collaborations from the audience to overcome these.

PRESENTATIONS:

Challenges, opportunities and the future of crowdsourcing collections data
Helen Hardy, Natural History Museum London

Connecting the dots, volunteers, and projects: Growing beyond goals with greater engagement
Meghan Ferriter, Smithsonian Institution

Notes from Nature - Using the Zooniverse platform as a collaborative project
Michael Denslow, Florida Museum of Natural History

Worldwide Engagement for Digitizing Biocollections: WeDigBio, the global transcription event
Elizabeth Ellwood, iDigBio, Florida State University


Friday May 19, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Meeting Rooms 4, 5 & 6

9:00am

C-06: Keeping Tabs on Ethics
Mental Health Ecosystem: Co-designing and Empowering with and for the Patients
Josep Perelló* - Universitat de Barcelona; Ferran Español - Universitat de Barcelona; Angel Sánchez - Universidad Carlos III de Madrid; Jordi Duch - Universitat Rovira i Virgili; Isabelle Bonhoure - Universitat de Barcelona

IP and Citizen Science: Who Owns Research Outcomes?
Christi Guerrini - Baylor College of Medicine

Language as a Crucial Component of Equity in Citizen Science
Samantha Estoesta - Royal Roads University

Regulatory Penumbra: What Happens If a Citizen Scientist Commits Research Misconduct?
Lisa Rasmussen - University of North Carolina, Charlotte, Department of Philosophy


Friday May 19, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Meeting Rooms 7, 8 & 9

9:00am

D-06: Symposium: Integrating Citizen Science into Conservation Resource Management: Strategies and Impacts
Integrating Citizen Science into Conservation Resource Management: Strategies and Impacts
Organizers: Jana Newman - US Fish and Wildlife Service; Leda Dunmire, The Pew Charitable Trusts, US Oceans Program, SE
The benefits that result when management agencies successfully integrate citizen science efforts into their resource management strategies have been well documented and yet, efforts to do so are still met with resistance despite strong support over the past few years from the Office of Science and Technology Policy of the White House. Acceptance that the investment is worthwhile and citizen science can provide credible scientific information is lacking. Acceptance can be further challenged in cases where resource management decisions are complex or controversial, decision-making procedures can be institutionalizedand potentially political, analysts can be dismissive of non-professional data, and contributors can risk consequences for livelihoods if decisions based on that data are not favorable. And yet, in the best of cases, citizen science has the potential to address data gaps and build trust for management decisions that reflect stakeholder input. Join us in an open discussion with our panel representing resource management agencies, conservation NGO partners, and project managers and researchers. After a short introduction we will open with two, 5-minute case studies illustrating the benefits and opportunities of citizen science for resource management, as well as the challenges agencies can face in pursuing those opportunities. Following that, two 10-minute presentations will share transferable lessons learned from years of implementation, evaluation, and listening to multiple stakeholders. We will close with a panel inviting audience contributions to a discussion about strategies for overcoming barriers to successfully integrate citizen science efforts into resource management.

PRESENTATIONS:

Introduction to Symposium
Leda Dunmire, The Pew Charitable Trusts, US Oceans Program, SE; Jana Newman, USFWS

Strategic Habitat Conservation with a little help from our friends.
Jana Newman,  I&M Branch Chief, US Fish and Wildlife Service

New possibilities and challenges for citizen science in fisheries management

Laura Oremland, NOAA Fisheries udents Discover Project

Citizen Science for Conservation Solutions: A COASSTal Model of Real-time Monitoring and Response

Hillary Burgess, Coastal Observation and Seabird Survey Team/COASST

Engaging Public Land Ranchers in Citizen Science: From Rancher Monitoring on Grazing Allotments to Rancher Participation in Collaborative Adaptive Management
María E. Fernández-Giménez, Department of Forest & Rangeland Stewardship, Colorado State University

Discussion


Friday May 19, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Meeting Rooms 10, 11 & 12

9:00am

E-06: The Power in Traditional Knowledge
Fostering Resilience and Adaptation to Drought in the High Plains: Ethically Engaging Communities Throughout the Research Process
Jacqueline Vadjunec* - Oklahoma State University/ Department of Geography; Todd Fagin - Oklahoma Biological Survey; Nicole Colston - Oklahoma State University, Department of Geography

The Transformative Capacity of Citizen Science to Empower and Enable Agro-pastoral Communities to Adapt Their Governance of Natural Resource in the Remote Tianshan Mountains in Central Asia
Mark Foggin*, Altyn Kapalova, Lira Sagynbekova,  Azamat Azarov*, Evgenii Shibkov, Aline Rosset, Jangyl Ismailova, Samat Kalmuratov, Christian Hergarten - Mountain Societies Research Institute, University of Central Asia

Why We Lose Traditional Ecological Knowledge and How Citizen Science Can Help Us Rebuild Our Knowledge Banks
Madhusudan Katti - North Carolina State University

Learning to Work with Nature: Designing for a Shared Intelligence on Fundamental Processes Such as Soil Function
Peter Donovan - Soil Carbon Coalition


Friday May 19, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Meeting Rooms 13, 14 & 15

10:00am

Coffee Break
Friday May 19, 2017 10:00am - 10:15am
Ballroom Concourse

10:15am

A-07: Environmental Management
Bringing Citizen Science into Land Management: A Case Study of the Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program
Rowan Converse* - Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program; Dan Shaw - Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program; Kim Eichhorst - Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program; May Leinhart - Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program

Engaging Citizens to Conserve Slender Loris in Urban Bangalore, India
Kaberi Kar Gupta - Urban Slender Loris Project

Ecological Citizenship: Communication, Engagement, Motivation and Adaptation Fostering Low Impact Sustainable Urban Drainage (LISUD)
Dawn Purves - University of Kingston

What Makes Citizen Science Useful for Environmental Decision-Making?
Ryan Meyer* - UC Davis Center for Community and Citizen Science; Heidi Ballard - University of California, Davis


Friday May 19, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Meeting Rooms 2 & 3

10:15am

B-07: Symposium: Embrace the Bureaucracy: Navigating Institutional Barriers to Citizen Science
Embrace the Bureaucracy: Navigating Institutional Barriers to Citizen Science
Organizer: Lea Shanley - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
This symposium explores the challenges to implementing citizen science across U.S. federal agencies and the bureaucracies and operating cultures they contain. The panelists will discuss how they have worked together and independently to address hurdles. In doing so, they will reveal how these organizations have evolved in their thinking about public participation in their activities. Moreover, this session provides a special case study of citizen science in large institutions and will offer potential strategies and solutions that may be useful to citizen science advocates seeking to implement citizen science projects in other organizations.

PRESENTATIONS:

Citizen Science at the US Environmental Protection Agency
Alison Parker*, ORISE fellow hosted by the US Environmental Protection Agency; Barbara Martinez*, Conservation X Labs

Citizen science in a world full of data
Ethan McMahon, US EPA, Office of Environmental Information

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Citizen Science: Overcoming Institutional Barriers and Growing a Federal Community
Lea Shanley, South Big Data Innovation Hub, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hil

Implementing citizen science projects within US Geological Survey: opportunities and challenges
Jake Weltzin, USA National Phenology Network and US Geological Survey

NASA's Public Participation Universe: Democratizing Innovation at the U.S. Civil Space Agency
Amy Kaminski, NASA

The Importance of Design in Open Innovation Efforts
Sophia Liu, US Geological Survey


Friday May 19, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Meeting Rooms 4, 5 & 6

10:15am

C-07: Symposium: Citizen Science Crossing the Line: Engendering Behavior Changes in Participants
Citizen Science Crossing the Line: Engendering Behavior Changes in Participants
Organizer: Becca Rodomsky-Bish
Citizen science is being used for more than collecting data. Several projects are exploring the ways that participation can engage individuals in behavior changes. This kind of work helps blur the line between what are often treated as independent systems when collecting data, but which are really profoundly intertwined socio-ecological systems. The leap, however, is not an easy one to make. This symposium collects perspectives from three projects each supporting participants to take the extra step of changing behaviors as a result of their engagement. Talks will cover both successes and failures: from linking online tools to real-world behaviors to the role of social interaction in change. Each project will, also, provide a glimpse into how behavior change is measured within their research. Learn from our work, gain some tools, and join us in crossing the line between data collection and real world impact.

PRESENTATIONS:

Design Principles for Online Learning Communities In Citizen Science
Ruth Kermish-Allen, Maine Math and Science Alliance

Habitat Network: Crossing the Line, A Project Engaged in Behavior Change
Becca Rodomsky-Bish, Cornell University

Spotteron: Crossing the Line, A Project Engaged in Behavior Change
Philipp Jonathan Hummer, Spotteron

The Great Sunflower Project: Crossing the Line, A Project Engaged in Behavior Change
Gretchen Lebuhn, San Francisco State University

Transformative and collaborative science for change: The next evolution for citizen science?
Robin Reid, Center for Collaborative Conservation, Colorado State University;
Co-Authors: María E. Fernández-Giménez, Professor, Department of Forest & Rangeland Stewardship, Colorado State University; Julia Parrish, Executive Director, COASST/University of Washington


Friday May 19, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Meeting Rooms 7, 8 & 9

10:15am

D-07: Symposium: A Diversity of BioBlitz Approaches
A Diversity of BioBlitz Approaches: Learning from the Past, Innovating for the Future
Organizer: Carrie Seltzer
The goal of this symposium is to share ideas and encourage discussion of best practices among people interested in BioBlitzes. BioBlitzes, which aim to find, identify, and document as many species as possible in a defined area during a short period of time, offer an introduction to citizen science for many people. A BioBlitz is a popular and effective technique for parks, schools and other organizations to learn more about what lives nearby, teach scientific skills and generate useful scientific data while cultivating a community of experts, teachers, students, and neighbors. There are many different ways to organize BioBlitzes depending on the audience and goals. This symposium brings together speakers who have organized BioBlitzes with a diversity of audiences, focuses, regions, and host institutions to share the evolution of their approaches (including pitfalls and lessons learned) in the areas of developing successful project goals, inclusion and diversity, sharing results, and advancing science education. Introduced by the National Geographic Society and moderated by a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow, this session will highlight perspectives from Encyclopedia of Life, the National Park Service, an undergraduate setting, a Biotech company, and national and international NGOs. The eight lightning talks will provide context for a moderated panel discussion, which will segue to a discussion including questions and ideas from the audience.

PRESENTATIONS:

Introduction to Symposium
Mary Ford, National Geographic

Bioblitz in the Mangroves of the Colombian Caribbean coast: Building new partnerships for conservation and sustainable use of urban nature
Vivianna Mourra, Ecoprogreso

Introducing a new role to improve BioBlitz data collection with iNaturalist
Kelly Coy, National Park Service - Biological Resources Division

It's Time to Get Nerdy with Nature: Urban BioBlitz Events as an Opportunity for Participant Engagement and Empowerment
Curtis Bennett, National Aquarium

MicroBioBlitzes: tips, tricks, and tools for exploring the large diversity of the microcosmos
Damon Tighe, Bio-Rad Laboratories / California Center for Natural History

Students in the field: Using a BioBlitz as an authentic undergraduate research experience in a non-majors science course
Kelly O'Donnell, Macaulay Honors College - City University of New York

The Encyclopedia of Life: Biodiversity information and tools to support BioBlitzes
Marie Studer, Encyclopedia of Life;
Co-Authors: Amy Lorenz, EOL Project Coordinator; Anne Haywood, Mountain to Sea Education

What's next for bioblitzes?
Rebecca Johnson, California Academy of Sciences

Panel & Audience Discussion 
Carrie Seltzer, AAAS Science & Technology Policy Felow, (Fellow at) National Science Foundation


Friday May 19, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Meeting Rooms 10, 11 & 12

10:15am

E-07: Transforming Institutions and Models with Citizen Science
Does Citizen Science Really Contribute to Nature Conservation? Sharing Evidence from Natural History Museums
Lucy Robinson* - Natural History Museum London; Heidi Ballard - University of California, Davis; Alison Young - California Academy of Sciences; Greg Pauly - Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Lila Higgins - Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Rebecca Johnson - California Academy of Sciences; John Tweddle - Natural History Museum London

New Methods New Knowledge: The Implications of Applying a Citizen Science Method to the Pharmaceutical Industry
Leah Morris - The University of King's College

Transforming How Hispanics Learn Science: An Emergent Informal Science Educational Model
Yogani Govender - Inter American University of Puerto Rico

Weather, Climate and Citizens: What Can a Meteorological Institute Get from Citizen Science?
Atte Harjanne* - Finnish Meteorological Institute; Heikki Tuomenvirta - Finnish Meteorological Institute


Friday May 19, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Meeting Rooms 13, 14 & 15

11:15am

Break
Friday May 19, 2017 11:15am - 11:30am
N/A

11:15am

Community Bioblitz
We will launch from and return to this location.

Friday May 19, 2017 11:15am - 1:15pm
Meeting Room 1

11:30am

A-08: Symposium: Citizen Science Communication - Connecting across disciplines
Citizen Science Communication - Connecting Across Disciplines
Organizer: Susanne Hecker - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research/German Centre for integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig
"Citizen science is one of the most dramatic developments in science communication in the last generation." Bruce V. Lewenstein (Lewenstein, 2016) Citizen science and science communication are both relatively young and highly inter- and transdisciplinary fields of research (Gascoigne et al., 2010; Jordan, Crall, Gray, Phillips, & Mellor, 2015). This symposium is a first cut to explore how the respective underlying concepts intertwine in theory and practice, and invites researchers and practitioners of both fields. Following Lewenstein's quote, we need to ask: how does citizen science contribute to the dramatic development in science communication? What is new and innovative about it? What is the development? Undeniably, science communication in citizen science has moved from a one-way communication towards a multi-directional exchange (Trench, 2006). From a citizen science perspective, we ask: What opportunities does science communication provide for citizen science activities beyond outreach? Where can science communication help citizen science project coordinators to face the challenges throughout the process? How can science communication empower all those involved in citizen science for enhanced exchange and reasoning? Citizen science and the process of engaging stakeholders and participants needs adequate flexibility as dialogue and interaction might develop in unforeseen ways and need respective translation process. The aim of this symposium is to investigate the synthesis and innovative potential of citizen science and science communication. We want to shed light on theory and best practice of citizen science communication as well as allow for dialogue and convergence of both disciplines to eventually cross-fertilise.

PRESENTATIONS:

Beyond the deficit model - Communication in citizen science
Susanne Hecker, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research/German Centre for integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

Citizen Journalism as a tool/new skill for citizen science projects - Best case study, Futurium Berlin, Germany
Monique Luckas, Futurium gGmbH

Science and Public Engagement
Bernard Schiele, Faculty of Communication, University of Quebec at Montreal, Canada

What are the interesting questions about citizen science?
Bruce V. Lewenstein, Cornell University


Friday May 19, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Meeting Rooms 2 & 3

11:30am

B-08: A Listening Session about Citizen Science and Science Learning
CHAIRS: Darlene Cavalier, Kenne Dibner, Raj Pandya

Given the potential that citizen science can play in shaping scientific understanding, it is time to take stock.  What do we know about how citizen science can support science learning? What are some effective strategies for designing citizen science projects to enhance participants' understanding of science and communities' capacity to use science to address their needs? What deserves further research?  How can citizen science offer experiences that support all learners? The National Academies is launching a new study “Designing Citizen Science to Support Science Learning” and we’d like to spend an hour collecting your input. Please attend this listening session to offer your ideas, insights, and suggestions.

Friday May 19, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Meeting Rooms 4, 5 & 6

11:30am

C-08: Understanding Participants
Exploring a Continuum of Involvement in a Citizen Science Program
Maria Sharova* - Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC); Alison Cawood - Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC)

The Process of Citizen Science. Lessons on Evaluating and Refining Citizen Science Projects
Megan Mueller* - Rocky Mountain Wild; Erica Garroutte - Denver Zoological Foundation; Heather Batts - Denver Zoological Foundation

Understanding Participants: Research on Participant Motivation and How to Use It in Practice
Anne Land-Zandstra* - Leiden University; Marjolein de Vries

Collaborative Modeling of Long-term Community-based Research Data in Rural Zimbabwe
M Eitzel - University of California, Santa Cruz; Emmanuel Mhike Hove - The Muonde Trust; Abraham Changarara - The Muonde Trust; Daniel Ndlovu - The Muonde Trust; Jon Solera - Seven Points Consulting; Alice Ndlovu - The Muonde Trust; Kleber Neves - Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro; Andre Veski - Tallinn University of Technology


Friday May 19, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Meeting Rooms 7, 8 & 9

11:30am

D-08: Symposium: Evidence-based principles to guide project owners in the co-management of project participants within the SciStarter ecosystem
Evidence-based Principles to Guide Project Owners in the Co-management of Project Participants Within the SciStarter Ecosystem
Organizer: Caren Cooper
Citizen Science projects do not exist in isolation, but among a rapidly growing number of project offerings. Recruiting and retaining participants, as well as undertaking scholarly studies of participation, in single projects overlooks synergies that might occur as individuals engage with multiple projects. SciStarter is the largest repository of citizen science projects in the world. Within SciStarter, information about more than 1,500 citizen science projects and characteristics of their participation, design, outcomes, and impacts are compiled and curated. Through syndicated outreach, SciStarter has recruited 50,000+ people to join its community of citizen scientists. Thanks to a NSF-AISL Pathways award, SciStarter 2.0 tools offer each member a dashboard to manage and display their citizen science activities, track their progress in projects, network with others, and consent to have their online behavior tracked across citizen science projects. SciStarter 2.0 tools help project owners to promote their projects and recruit participants from specific locations or with certain skills, as well as learn about their participants' associations with other projects. Since 2010, SciStarter has directed people towards the projects most suitable to their interests, abilities, and location. Owners of those projects, however, rarely reciprocate, that is, they generally do not encourage their volunteers to join other projects or the SciStarter community. This symposium provides initial evidence, from quantitative and qualitative research, of the benefits of clustering projects online and fostering participation in multiple projects, and offers guidance to project owners for managing volunteers within a diverse ecosystem of projects with new SciStarter 2.0 tools.

PRESENTATIONS:

Designing Participation Experiences to Engage and Retain Long-Term Volunteers
Snigdha Petluru*, University of Maryland-College Park; Andrea Wiggins

Divers vs dabblers: stronger science and conservation outcome when volunteers participate in multiple, varied projects
Caren Cooper*, Associate Professor, North Carolina State University and SciStarter; Lincoln Larson

Presentation matters: how teachers assess citizen science projects for classrooms
Jonathan Brier*, University of Maryland-College Park; Andrea Wiggins

SciStarter 2.0 Tools: A Digital Platform to Foster and Study Sustained Engagement in Citizen Science
Catherine Hoffman*, SciStarter;
Co-Authors: Darlene Cavalier, Caren Cooper

Using Marketing Strategies to Examine Volunteer Recruitment and Retention in Online Citizen Science Projects
Alycia Crall, SciStarter


Friday May 19, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Meeting Rooms 10, 11 & 12

11:30am

E-08: Insights from Computer Science
Citizen Data Scientists - Combining Human and Machine Processing
Frank Ostermann* - ITC, University of Twente; Menno-Jan Kraak - ITC - University of Twente; Raul Zurita-Milla - ITC - University of Twente

Foldit: Lessons, Discoveries, and Opportunities from 8 Years of Citizen Science in Computational Biochemistry
Seth Cooper - Northeastern University

Role of Human-computer Interaction (HCI) in Advancing Citizen Science
Tracy Lee* - Miistakis Institute; Danah Duke - Miistakis Institute; Brian Traynor - Faculty of Communication Studies, Mount Royal University

Design to Implementation: Creating an Effective Volunteer Monitoring Database
Holden Sparacino - Alliance for Aquatic Resource Monitoring (ALLARM)


Friday May 19, 2017 11:30am - 12:30pm
Meeting Rooms 13, 14 & 15

12:30pm

Lunch & Poster Session #2

Posters will be available for viewing from 7:00am Thursday - 7:30pm Friday. There will be two Poster Sessions during the main conference: Poster Session #1 (P1) will be on Thursday from 12:45pm – 1:45pm; and Poster Session #2 (P2) on Friday from 1:00pm – 2:00pm. The following authors will stand by their posters during P2:

The Benefits of a Statewide Citizen-based Monitoring Network
Eva Lewandowski - Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

Using Citizen Science in Environmental Science Curricula to Foster Student Engagement and Develop a Sense of Place
Kevyn Juneau - University of Wisconsin-River Falls

Secondary School Rubrics for Citizen Science Projects: A Proposal and a Field Experiment with 5 Different Citizen Science Projects
Josep Perelló - Universitat de Barcelona

Sink or Swim: New Endeavors in Citizen Science for AIS Management
Megan Weber - University of Minnesota Extension

Signs of the Seasons: Working with Citizen Scientists and Research Partners in New England to Compare Current...
Esperanza Stancioff - University of Maine Cooperative Extension

The CoCoRaHS Comment Readers Club: Empowering Citizen Scientists to Become Citizen Data Analysts
Noah Newman - CoCoRaHS

Monitoring Invasive Species Through a Coordinated 'AIS Snapshot Day'
Paul Skawinski - UW-Extension Lakes Program

Photographs Contain Visual Data - and Were Used to Document 3500 Nectar Plants That Attract and Feed US Butterflies...
Susan Dunlap - Aerulean

Inspiring Young Students Through Experiential Learning in the Field
Lauren Jonaitis - Bowling Green State University

The Informal Educator's Guide: Blending Citizen Science with Existing Professional Responsibilities
Erica Prange - Cleveland Museum of Natural History

What Does Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring Look Like in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed?
Lea Rubin - Izaak Walton League of America

Linking Air Quality Data and Community Member Observations to Better Understand Complex Problems
Ashley Collier - University of Colorado, Boulder

Untapped: Accessing Cooperative Extension to Strengthen Connections Between Citizen Science and Community Decision-Making
Malin Clyde - University of New Hampshire Extension

The Role of Citizen Science and Stewardship: A Case Study of Two Urban Ecological Systems with Minority Stakeholder Groups
Amanda Sorensen - Rutgers University

Monitoring with Purpose- the Dynamic Feedback Loop Between Citizen Scientists, Audubon's Conservation Science...
Brooke Bateman - National Audubon Society

Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Bats Through the Lens of Citizen Science
Karen Root - Bowling Green State University

Offering a Variety of Citizen Science Programs to Engage the Public in Hands-on Science
Jennifer Lentz - Aquarium of the Pacific

Recruiting, Training, and Retaining Skilled Citizen Scientists for Long-term Bird Banding as Part of the...
Peter Harris - Wolf Ridge Environmental Learning Center

Using Citizen Science to Predict the Long Term Impacts of Urbanisation on Biodiversity
James Plummer - University of South Australia

SciStarter's Project Repository as a Resource for Research: Connecting Project Design to Evidence on Outcomes
Holly Faulkner - Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Successful Youth-Based Citizen Science
Monika Krach - Greater Farallones Association

Validation and Curation of Citizen Science Data
Andrea Wiggins - University of Maryland

Volunteer River Herring Monitoring Programs in Maine and Massachusetts: Lessons Learned About Running Volunteer Programs...
Karen Bieluch – Dartmouth College

Science and Technology Futures Initiative
Robert Fuchs - University of Southern California

Southeastern American Kestrel Citizen Science Monitoring Project
Brendan O'Connor - Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

SpottyRain: An Online Drought Monitoring Campaign in the Southern High Plains
Nicole Colston - Oklahoma State University

Quality Control Considerations for Public Engagement in Urban Biodiversity Monitoring
Holly Kinas - Miistakis Institute

Lessons Learned from Building a Citizen Science Project with Participatory Methodologies
Caren Queiroz - Federal University of Bahia

Restoring the Value of Urban Trees Through Citizen Science
Tainara Ramim - UFABC

Transformation and Adaptation of Researchers to Using Citizen Science in Puerto Rico
Yogani Govender - Inter American University of Puerto Rico

Streamlining Embedded Assessment of Citizen Scientists' Skills
Rachel Becker-Klein - PEER Associates

The Best of Both Worlds: Cloud Observation and Satellite Comparison
Sarah McCrea - SSAI/NASA LaRC

Salad or Gazpacho? Blending Sound Science and Quality Youth Programming
Janet Ady - Bureau of Land Management

Kiwi's Counting Kiwi - Strategic Citizen Science Enabling Threatened Species Recovery
Monica Peters - people+science

Using Volunteer Effort Wisely: Efficient Task Assignment
Lucy Fortson - University of Minnesota

Uncovering the Effects of Drought on Bird Communities in a California City with Citizen Science
Madhusudan Katti - NC State University

Volunteer Computing: Why It Matters
Juan Hindo - IBM World Community Grid

Validation of Local Perceived Sustainability Indicators Using Modern and Traditional Knowledge and...
Hector Mongi - University of Dodoma

Three Rivers QUEST
Melissa ONeal - West Virginia Water Research Institute

Outdoor Teaching for Hispanic Citizen Scientists Using Informal Science Education Model
Sandra Faria - Para la Naturaleza

Moving Beyond Click Work: Advanced Communities Within the Zooniverse
Grant Miller - University of Oxford/Zooniverse

VolunteerWatch: Managing Citizen Science Volunteers Across a Park District
Matthew Knittel - Cleveland Metroparks

NIH Funding Opportunities for Citizen Science
Tony Beck - National Institutes of Health

Ten Principles of Citizen Science
Lucy Robinson - Natural History Museum London

Tracking Interbasin Transit by Marine Wildlife via Distributed Communications
Seabird McKeon - Smithsonian Institution

The Center for Community and Citizen Science at University of California - Davis: How Can Universities Most Effectively Serve the Field of Citizen Science?
Ryan Meyer – University of California, Davis

Meeting Participants Where They Are At: Accepting Submissions via E-mail, Social Media, and Text Messaging
Richard Smart - Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Score the Shore: Citizen-generated Data Empowers Communities to Protect and Restore Lake Habitat
Jo Latimore - Michigan State University

Lessons Learned from a Nationwide Citizen Science Project in Germany as a Tool for Educating School Classes in Science
Katrin Knickmeier - University of Kiel

Restoration and Herbivore Exclusion 5th Grade Citizen Science: Influence of Non-native Removal and Herbivore Exclusion on Native Shrubs
Jennifer Long - Center for Environmental Biology

Volunteers of the National Map Corps
Erin Korris - United States Geological Survey

Youth Citizen Science and Science Identity
Sinead Brien - University of California, Davis

SuperProject Backyard Bat and Carnivore Survey: Museum Scientists Team up with Homeowners to Investigate Backyard Mammal Ecology
Miguel Ordenana - Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

The Great Grevy's Rally: Blending CitSci and A.I. for Zebra Conservation
Jon Van Oast - Wild Me

Risk Management in Citizen Science: Moving from Hoping for the Best to Planning for the Worst
Gitte Venicx - Earthwatch Institute

How Wide Is the Rainbow? Measuring the Effects of Citizen Science Participation on the Citizen
Shannon Waters - Surfrider Foundation

Public Participation in Scientific Research at the US National Science Foundation
Ellen McCallie - National Science Foundation

Teen-Driven Citizen Science: Digital Tools and Pedagogical Approaches for Fostering Collaborative Teen-led Inquiry
David Bild - Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum

Studying the Effects of Ocean Acidification and Warming on Rocky Intertidal Communities with High-School Citizen Scientists
John Cigliano - Cedar Crest College

Involving Scientists in a School Based Citizen Science Program
Tony Murphy - The GLOBE Implementation Office

Implementing a Global Citizen Science Program
Tony Murphy - The GLOBE Implementation Office

Transforming Pro-Am Collaborative Astronomy into Citizen Science Astronomy
Padma Yanamandra-Fisher - Space Science Institute

Using Citizen Science to Support State Natural Resource Agencies: A Case Study of Virginia Master Naturalist Volunteers
Michelle Prysby - Virginia Tech/Virginia Cooperative Extension

A Pathway from Citizen Science to Public Policy
Ted Smith - Revon Systems

Integrating a Citizen Science Project in Different Education Settings
Yurong He - University of Maryland

BBFuels of Puerto Rico, LLC: A Sustainable Industrial Model for Bioethanol Production in Puerto Rico
Jorge Nina Espinosa - University of Puerto Rico

The benefits of incorporating a Citizen Science Program into Coral Reef Restoration Activities
Dalton Hesley - University of Miami

D3: Discovering Didymo's Distribution
Matt Barney - Trout Unlimited

Water Ambassador Program
Christina Chanes - University of the Virgin Islands

...


Friday May 19, 2017 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Ballroom

1:15pm

Speaker Ready Room
Friday May 19, 2017 1:15pm - 5:00pm
Meeting Room 1

2:15pm

A-09: Evolving How We Think About Our Practice
Fireballs in the Sky: A Global Fireball Network in Our Pockets
Renae Sayers* - Curtin Univeristy; Phil Bland - Curtin University, Australia; Brian Day - NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute; Jay Ridgewell - Curtin University, Australia; Yara Al-Rajeh - AMES Research Centre, NASA

The Evolving Role of Citizen Science in Education
Joseph Roche* - Trinity College Dublin; Nicola Davis - Trinity College Dublin

Citizen Science as an Innovative Disruptor
Nicole Garneau - Denver Museum of Nature & Science

From Wildlife to Justice: Creating Safe Environmental Spaces for Everyone
Angelique Hjarding - North Carolina Wildlife Federation


Friday May 19, 2017 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Meeting Rooms 2 & 3

2:15pm

B-09: Participants and Participation
Addressing the Needs and Motivations of Citizen Scientists Through a Virtual Research Center
Pamela Gay - Astronomical Society of the Pacific; Team CosmoQuest - Astronomical Society of the Pacific

Assessing Participant Demographics in a PPSR Project: Comparing Two Survey Techniques
Renee Lyons* - Clemson University; Michelle Cook - Clemson University; David White - Clemson University

Can Citizen Science Shift Attitudes? The Importance of Studying Participants
Stephanie Schuttler* - North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, North Carolina State University; Kathryn Stevenson - North Carolina State University; Robert Dunn - North Carolina State University; Roland Kays - North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences & NC State University

Engagement in Citizen Science: An Overview of Volunteer Motivation and Retention in the US Geological Survey's National Map Corps
Erin Korris* - United States Geological Survey; Elizabeth McCartney - U.S. Geological Survey


Friday May 19, 2017 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Meeting Rooms 4, 5 & 6

2:15pm

C-09: Community-driven Coastal Governance
The Communication and Influence of Citizen Science in Lake Communities
Helen Perivier - Department of Natural Resources and the Environment , University of New Hampshire; Jeffrey A. Schloss - University of New Hampshire Extension; Sara Steiner - NH Department of Environmental Services (NHDES); Mimi Larsen Becker - Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of New Hampshire

Investigating We Learn About the Sea - 10 Years of Doing Marine Litter Research with K-12 Students
Martin Thiel - universidad catolica del norte

Sediment and Seashores, a Community Driven Approach to Marine Monitoring
Sally Carson* - New Zealand Marine Studies Centre, Department of Marine Science, University of Otago; Jennifer Rock - Centre for Science Communication, University of Otago; Matthew Desmond - Department of Marine Science, University of Otago

Mapping the Hidden Hazards: Using Citizen Science to Create Alternative Spatial Narratives and Influence Environmental Practice and Policy in Urban Watersheds
Na'Taki Jelks - West Atlanta Watershed Alliance, Inc.


Friday May 19, 2017 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Meeting Rooms 7, 8 & 9

2:15pm

D-09: Symposium: How do we figure out what works for youth in citizen science?
How Do We Figure out What Works for Youth in Citizen Science?: Bridging Research and Practice to Collaboratively Develop Priority Education Research Questions for Youth-focused Citizen Science
Organizer: Heidi Ballard
Citizen science offers tantalizing opportunity for young people to learn and grow through action taken to address and answer pressing and relevant research questions. Potential outcomes for youth are numerous, including content knowledge, science skills, understanding of the nature of science, and increased science confidence. But in which contexts are which outcomes most likely for which youth? And how can we learn more about what works and for whom, and under which conditions? In this 2-part research and practice symposium, co-hosted by the Education and Research & Evaluation Working Groups, we will address these questions through 1) examples from the field and 2) facilitated group discussions. We begin with a panel of researchers focused on different aspects of youth learning in diverse settings (i.e. Ballard et al. 2016, Fee and Trautmann 2013). Each will share their research questions, methods, key theories, preliminary findings, and how program design or practice might incorporate research lessons . In the last quarter of the session, presenters and attendees will sort themselves into groups around topics of interest (e.g., specific outcome areas, role of adult mentors and professional scientists, student voice and choice) to generate lists of research questions and methods that would advance the practices of citizen science with youth. Each group will be asked to record their thinking and prioritize their questions according to feasibility and potential impact to the field. Following the conference, symposium organizers will summarize the work of the groups and share via a guest post to the CSA blog.

PRESENTATIONS:

Evaluating science identity in youth using BirdSleuth's Habitat Connections curriculum in afterschool and informal education settings
Jennifer Fee, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

How can we improve learning about biodiversity and the environment through student engagement in short-duration citizen science events? Lessons from 2016 BioBlitzes
Ardice Hartry, University of California, Berkeley

Learning from youth-focused community and citizen science (CCS): how do we know the impacts of participation on youth understanding and agency toward environmental science?
Heidi Ballard, University of California, Davis

Stepping up: the roles youth play in citizen science projects and their relationship to place
Colin Dixon, School of Education, University of California - Davis


Friday May 19, 2017 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Meeting Rooms 10, 11 & 12

2:15pm

E-09: Web Development Insights
Taking on the Challenges of Broadening Participation in Data Visualization and Analysis with FieldScope
Daniel Edelson - BSCS

Patterns of Behaviour Across Online Citizen Science
Chris Lintott* - Zooniverse.org; Helen Spiers - University of Oxford; Grant Miller - University of Oxford / Zooniverse; Lucy Fortson - University of Minnesota; Laura Trouille - Adler Planetarium

Validated Dynamic Consensus Approach for Citizen Science Projects Employing Crowd-based Detection Tasks
Pietro Michelucci - Human Computation Institute

Working Together: Developers and Project Leads
Robert Pastel - Michigan Technological University


Friday May 19, 2017 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Meeting Rooms 13, 14 & 15

3:15pm

Coffee Break
Friday May 19, 2017 3:15pm - 3:30pm
Ballroom Concourse

3:30pm

A-10: Symposium: Using Citizen Science and Deep Participation to Support Urban Diversity
Using Citizen Science and Deep Participation to Support Urban Biodiversity: Los Angeles as a Case Study
Organizer: Sabrina Drill - University of Californa Cooperative Extension
Cities around the world, including L.A., are facing massive shifts due to development, climate change, and invasive species among other threats. Balancing these shifts are active communities, public agencies, and non-profits who are investing resources to adapt and create resilient cities. Los Angeles is working towards resiliency, using deep participation in citizen science as a tool. The city is a sprawling metropolitan area, sitting in one of the world's 35 biodiversity hotspots, and home to an incredible diversity of cultures and communities. A limiting factor to making better decisions for communities and policy makers is a lack of data regarding biodiversity and critical ecosystems, as well as support from human communities. The complex nature and scale of LA and many other cities, means that we cannot understand the ecology or find the political will for conservation and restoration without deep public participation. But how do you foster deep participation? The presenters in this session represent a range of organizations who are working towards this goal using different approaches to citizen science. Each organization seeks to bridge interests from varying audiences (e.g. local communities, school groups , naturalists) and researchers to inform management and the political process. We will present our projects as a case study, outlining best practices and lessons learned (including what did not work), about the deep participation and share results that translate citizen science data into science, management, and policy.

PRESENTATIONS:

Building a collaborative urban citizen science program to inform community tree planting in Los Angeles
Mark Chandler, Earthwatch Institute

Exploring Los Angeles urban biodiversity: A museum-wide initiative
Miguel Ordenana, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

The Nature Conservancy's Urban Conservation Strategy for Los Angeles
Sophie Parker, The Nature Conservancy

Training Naturalists, Engaging Anglers
Sabrina Drill, Natural Resources Advisor/California Naturalist Associate Director, University of Californa Cooperative Extension


Friday May 19, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Meeting Rooms 2 & 3

3:30pm

C-10: Symposium: Building engaged citizen science communities through libraries
Building Engaged Citizen Science Communities Through Libraries
Organizer: Holly Menninger
Whether situated in a town or on a campus, libraries serve as gathering place and access point. Libraries facilitate learning and literacy by providing constituents with direct access to knowledge, expertise, and increasingly, technology. Through innovative programming and shared space, libraries draw in diverse audiences and promote community engagement. Core values of engagement, democratization, and creation of new knowledge are shared by libraries and citizen science, alike. Moreover, libraries are positioned to play key roles in building engaged communities through citizen science. Yet, interaction between professionals in citizen science and libraries has been limited to a few individuals or organizations motivated to forge local collaborations or offer one-time programs. These collaborations are an important start, and can provide examples that will inform and inspire sustained partnerships. Our goal is to bring together practicing librarians and citizen science professionals to share best practices emerging from successful collaborations and discuss opportunities to strengthen and expand libraries' roles in building communities through citizen science. We anticipate that this symposium will move our thinking forward, and lead to a future publication in Citizen Science: Theory and Practice. Speakers will offer perspectives on: 1) academic libraries as champions and conveners of citizen science; 2) how library networks can facilitate participation in citizen science through access to equipment and programs; 3) building local citizen science communities through museum-library partnerships where there are issues of access and equity; and 4) how to enhance science literacy within public libraries to increase community access to citizen science and scientists.

PRESENTERS:

Building citizen science access, equity, and engagement beyond the museum walls: A case study of a library-museum partnership in Los Angeles
Lila Higgins, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County;
Co-Authors: Richard Smart, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County; Miguel Ordeñana, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Engaging a higher education community with citizen science: The Wolfpack Citizen Science Challenge
Karen Ciccone, NCSU Libraries;
Co-Authors: Debbie Currie, NCSU Libraries; Heidi Tebbe, NCSU Libraries; Holly Menninger, NC State University; Roland Kays, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences & NC State University

Public libraries as citizen science allies
Cynthia Randall, Cornerstones of Science

Scaling up science with library partners to loan sensors and engage citizens
Roland Kays, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences & NC State University;
Co-Authors: Arielle Parsons, NC Museum of Natural Sciences; Alexandra Mash, NC Museum of Natural Sciences; Cal Shepherd, State Library of North Carolina; Johnnie Pippin, State Library of North Carolina; Jon Shaw, North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission


Friday May 19, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Meeting Rooms 7, 8 & 9

3:30pm

D-10: Symposium: How do we figure out what works for youth in citizen science?
How Do We Figure out What Works for Youth in Citizen Science?: Bridging Research and Practice to Collaboratively Develop Priority Education Research Questions for Youth-focused Citizen Science
Organizer: Sarah Kirn
Citizen science offers tantalizing opportunity for young people to learn and grow through action taken to address and answer pressing and relevant research questions. Potential outcomes for youth are numerous, including content knowledge, science skills, understanding of the nature of science, and increased science confidence. But in which contexts are which outcomes most likely for which youth? And how can we learn more about what works and for whom, and under which conditions? In this 2-part research and practice symposium, co-hosted by the Education and Research & Evaluation Working Groups, we will address these questions through 1) examples from the field and 2) facilitated group discussions. We begin with a panel of researchers focused on different aspects of youth learning in diverse settings (i.e. Ballard et al. 2016, Fee and Trautmann 2013). Each will share their research questions, methods, key theories, preliminary findings, and how program design or practice might incorporate research lessons . In the last quarter of the session, presenters and attendees will sort themselves into groups around topics of interest (e.g., specific outcome areas, role of adult mentors and professional scientists, student voice and choice) to generate lists of research questions and methods that would advance the practices of citizen science with youth. Each group will be asked to record their thinking and prioritize their questions according to feasibility and potential impact to the field. Following the conference, symposium organizers will summarize the work of the groups and share via a guest post to the CSA blog.

PRESENTATIONS:

Authentic science learning, focus on place, and changes in underserved students' views about science and its role in their future.
Bill Zoellick, Schoodic Institute at Acadia National Park

Unpacking assumptions about what matters to teachers and students in citizen science
Emily Harris, University of California, Davis


Friday May 19, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Meeting Rooms 10, 11 & 12

3:30pm

E-10: Symposium: A Global Movement: CS Around the World from a Scientific-Social-Cultural-Political Context
A Global Movement? Citizen Science Around the World from a Scientific-social-cultural-political Context
Organizer: Jessie Cappadonna - Queensland University of Technology
Regional variation in the social-cultural-political context of citizen science leads to important variation in its diversification and growth. This symposium will provide an overview of regional similarities and differences between citizen science initiated in Australia, China, Europe, and the United States, as well as the opportunities and challenges that this offers to global citizen science projects. The state of citizen science, including primary drivers, development strategies utilized, and support mechanisms (e.g. financial, structural, and institutional) will be considered. Speakers will marshal regional project examples to highlight citizen science goals, diversity, and outcomes. Regional efforts underway and visions for the future will be discussed.

PRESENTATIONS:

Citizen science across Australia: Diversity, design, support, and impact
Jessie Cappadonna, PhD Student, Queensland University of Technology

Expansion of citizen science across the United States
Darlene Cavalier, Arizona State University and SciStarter

Factors that influence citizen science progress across Europe
Muki Haklay, University College London

Modes of public participation in scientific research across China
Elizabeth Tyson, Science & Technology Innovation Program, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

The WeDigBio event — International partners produce a global data campaign for citizen science
Austin Mast, Florida State University


Friday May 19, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Meeting Rooms 13, 14 & 15

3:45pm

B-10: Partnership and Cooperation
Using Partnerships to Leverage Limited Resources: The Biscayne Bay Drift Card Study
Chelle King* - Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science; Laura Bracken - University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science; Rebecca Peterson - Vizcaya Museum and Gardens

What Is the Role of Academic-Community Partnership Capacity in Adaptive Drought Communication? Lessons from Open Public Meetings
Nicole Colston* - Oklahoma State University; Jacqueline Vadjunec - Oklahoma State University/ Department of Geography; Todd Fagin - Oklahoma Biological Survey

Measures to Facilitate Collaboration Between Citizen Science Projects - an Approach for Sharing Resources
Barbara Heinisch - University of Vienna, Centre for Translation Studies


Friday May 19, 2017 3:45pm - 4:30pm
Meeting Rooms 4, 5 & 6

5:00pm

A 'Night in the Cloud' Closing Reception - Open to the Public
This capstone event of the CitSci2017 Conference brings together project leaders and the public to celebrate citizen science, in a mix of festival, exhibit hall, Café Scientifique, and major media event featuring the new citizen science TV series, The Crowd & The Cloud.

Featured: The Crowd & The Cloud
The evening’s featured event is selections from The Crowd & The Cloud, a 4-part public television series exploring the new frontier of citizen science in the age of mobile technology. A lively panel discussion will be led by series host and former NASA Chief Scientist, Waleed Abdalati, the Executive Producer, Geoffrey Haines-Stiles, as well as stars from projects highlighted in the show.

Find YOUR project!
Before the screening, attendees can grab a drink and jump into a festival-style mixer of project opportunities. Over 70 citizen science project leaders will be on hand to share their activities and resources–up close and personal–with Twin Cities residents: educators, librarians, parents, and anyone else wondering how to get started with citizen science. We can all but guarantee that attendees will walk away with 5 projects they are itching to join, get their students involved in, or tell their friends about.Whether you’re curious about citizen science and wondering how to get started, or already deeply involved in a project, this behind-the-scenes, all-access evening is for you!

This event is sponsored by:
The Saint Paul Foundation
AV support courtesy of: The Crowd & The Cloud (supported by NSF, the National Science Foundation, distributed by American Public Television, and producted by Passport to Knowledge/Geoff Haines-Stiles Productions, Inc.)
-----------------
Citizen Science - For All Ages: Thriving in Hennepin County, Minnesota
Mary Karius - Hennepin County Environment and Energy

GotScience: Creating Space for Open-Access Science Communication and Education
Kate Stone - Science Connected

CrowdWater
Barbara Strobl - University of Zurich

NatureLynx
Joelle Chille Cale - Alberta Biodiversity Monitoring Institute

Mobile Environmental Citizen Science at Michigan Tech
Robert Pastel - Michigan Technological University

HerpMapper.org
Christopher Smith - HerpMapper.org

OpenSystems or Towards a Multidisciplinary Practice Where Art and Participation Are a Fundamental Part of the Way How Science Is Carried Out
Isabelle Bonhoure - Universitat de Barcelona

Red-headed Woodpecker Recovery Project
Caitlin Potter - University of Minnesota Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve

Road-Stream Crossings: Characterization and Remediation
Thomas Tisue - Muskegon Community College

FracTracker Mobile App: A Tool for Documenting Oil & Gas Industry Activity
Kirk Jalbert - FracTracker Alliance

CitSci.org
Russell Scarpino - CitSci.org, Colorado State University

Snapshot Wisconsin
Christina Locke - Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

The Citizen Science Program at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Alison Cawood - Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Mutual Benefits of the Results for Participants and Researchers
Rémi Knaff - INRA

Cochrane Crowd: A Year In
Anna Noel-Storr - Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group

Monarch Larva Monitoring Project
Karen Oberhauser - University of Minnesota

Plants of Concern
Jason Miller - Plants of Concern at the Chicago Botanic Garden

Habitat Network
Megan Whatton - The Nature Conservancy

Dragonfly Swarm Project
Christine Goforth - North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

Driven to Discover: How YOUR Cit Sci Project Can Help Youth Become *Driven to Discover*
Andrea Lorek Strauss - University of Minnesota Extension

Make Your Mark in Biomedical Research with Mark2Cure
Ginger Tsueng - The Scripps Research Institute

Go Orchids
Maria Sharova - Smithsonian Environmental Research Center

Cartoscope
Sofia Eleni Spatharioti - Northeastern University

NOAA Marine Debris Monitoring and Assessment Project
Sherry Lippiatt - NOAA Marine Debris Program

The Encyclopedia of Life: An Open Biodiversity Resource for Citizen Science and Learning
Marie Studer - Encyclopedia of Life

The Center for Community and Citizen Science at University of California - Davis: How Can Universities Most Effectively Serve the Field of Citizen Science?
Ryan Meyer - UC Davis Center for Community and Citizen Science

Fresh Data; The Timely Exchange of Questions and Answers
Jennifer Hammock - Encyclopedia of Life, Smithsonian

Pharmalinked
Leah Morris - The University of King's College

The Drones Are Coming
Robert Stevenson - UMass Boston

Foldit
Seth Cooper - Northeastern University

Anecdata.org: A Free Platform for Citizen Science
Duncan Bailey - MDI Biological Laboratory

Biscayne Bay Drift Card Project (BayDrift)
Chelle King - Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science

Digital Earth Watch Picture Post Network - How Outdoor Digital Photographers Can Become Citizen Scientists
Annette Schloss - University of New Hamsphire

GLOBE Observer
Kristen Weaver - SSAI, Inc./NASA Earth Science Education Collaborative

Federal Tools for Citizen Science and Environmental Justice
Laura Stewart - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

It's Thrush Time. Tracking Birds Activities and Use It as Indicator of Noise Pollution in Big Cities: A Brazilian Citisci Project to Be Extended around the World
Sandro Von Matter - Federal Rural University of Rio

Establishing Native Plants in Restoration: Seeds or Seedlings?
Jennifer Long - Center for Environmental Biology

Aurorasaurus
Elizabeth MacDonald - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Sierra to Sea: Discovering Greenhouse Gas Flux Within the Soil of Sierra Nevadan Meadows Through Citizen Science
Gitte Venicx - Earthwatch Institute

Land Listeners Project with the Soil Carbon Coalition
Didi Pershouse - Soil Carbon Coalition and Center for Sustainable Medicine

The Soil Carbon Coalition's Atlasbiowork.com and Land Listeners Projects
Didi Pershouse - Soil Carbon Coalition and Center for Sustainable Medicine

Water Action Volunteers Citizen Stream Monitoring Program
Peggy Compton - University of Wisconsin-Extension

Partnership for Grassroots, Non-commercial Seed Systems for Community and Climate
Daniela Soleri - UC Santa Barbara

Societal Contributions to Globe at Night Observations in the Last 10 Years
Constance Walker - National Optical Astronomy Observatory

Cedar Creek Wildlife Survey
Jonathan Poppele - Minnesota Wildlife Tracking Project 

Sci starter
Catherine Hoffman

Market Science
Ryan Briscoe Runquist

Mutual Benefits of the Results for Participants and Researchers
Rémi Knaff - INRA

Genetics of Taste Lab
Tiffany Nuessle - Denver Museum of Nature & Science

Zooniverse 
Lucy Fortson- Zooniverse at Adler Planetarium



Friday May 19, 2017 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Ballroom

9:30pm

Globe At Night - Rate the Brightness of the Night Sky!
Sometimes what we lose can be just as important as what we gain. The loss of something that has influenced our culture for millennia can change our culture's perspective of the world around us. Yet if change happens slowly, we may not realize we have lost anything. Case in point: what if a starry night sky had never inspired Van Gogh to paint "Starry Night" or Holst to compose "The Planets" or Shakespeare write sonnets that encompass astronomy? Citizen-science is a rewardingly inclusive way to bring awareness to the public on important issues like the disappearing starry night sky, its causes and solutions. Citizen-science can also provide meaningful, hands-on, minds-on "science process" experiences for the general public. One program that does both is Globe at Night  (www.globeatnight.org), an international campaign to raise public awareness of the impact of light pollution by having people measure night-sky brightness and submit observations from a computer or smart phone. People use the data to monitor levels of light pollution around the world, as well as understand light pollution's effects on energy consumption, plants, wildlife, human health and our ability to enjoy a starry night sky. Projects have compared Globe at Night data with ground-truthing using meters for an energy audit as well as with data on birds, population density, satellite data and trends over time. Globe at Night allows us to teach our children to be better stewards for tomorrow, to learn to light more responsibly and that the solutions are simple and feasible.

Come join us on Friday night (after the Night in the Cloud Closing Reception) and become part of the Globe at Night Family. Handouts on how to easily participate in the Globe at Night campaigns will be available at the Globe at Night booth (“Societal Contributions to Globe at Night Observations in the Last 10 Years”) at the closing reception. For more information about the ongoing citizen-science campaigns, see the poster “Globe at Night: Many Hands Make Light Work” on Thursday. The Globe at Night director (Connie Walker) will be at the poster from 12:15-1:45 on Thursday.

Volunteers who want to be scientists for the night: here is what you will be doing: please have a smart phone of any type and go to www.globeatnight.org/webapp/ which is the report page you will use to rate the brightness of your night sky. Then go outside after 9:30pm but before 11pm and stand as far away as you can from city lights. Look southwest (to west) about a third to halfway up the sky from the ground. You will notice a backwards question mark. That is the mane of the lion. The dot in the backwards question mark is the bright star, Regulus. To the left are three stars that form a triangle, which are the lion’s backend. The area described is the constellation, Leo, with which you will be comparing to the 8 star charts on the report page “app”.  Follow the 6 simple steps outlined in the report page “app” and you will have made a difference in helping scientists to monitor the levels of light pollution worldwide!

Starry night skies to you!
The Globe at Night Team



Friday May 19, 2017 9:30pm - 11:00pm
Offsite - depart from Intercontinental Hotel
 
Saturday, May 20
 

8:00am

FIELD TRIP: Cedar Creek Ecosystem (pre-registration and additional fee: $35)
The University of Minnesota’s Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve is an incredible natural laboratory for ecological research, teaching, education and outreach: 5600 acres containing an astonishing diversity of ecosystems, from prairies to pine forests to oak savannas to peat swamps, and all these habitats' associated plants and animals. Over the last 75 years, scientists working at Cedar Creek have pushed the boundaries of our understanding of the natural world - the modern science of ecosystem ecology and food webs was developed here, as was the technology to track wildlife using radio collars. Current research on biodiversity, prescribed burning and climate change continue to shape the way we understand the world around us and our impact on it. Cedar Creek also has a strong education and outreach program. We host thousands of K-12 students on field trips each year, provide tours and programs for adults, special interest groups, and the community, and run several citizen science initiatives. One of these, the Red-headed Woodpecker Recovery Project, is an 8-year old volunteer research and monitoring project studying declining woodpecker populations in Minnesota. Another, the Cedar Creek Wildlife Survey, is a new project that documents and studies the diversity, abundance and habitat use of wildlife on Cedar Creek's property. Both these programs will be highlighted at CitSci 2017. We are also in the process of developing a participatory phenology and cultural history trail for visiting school groups and the general public that will open in spring 2017, and host one-off citizen science events throughout the year (Christmas Bird Count, Breeding Bird Survey, BioBlitz, etc). CitSci 2017 attendees are invited to visit Cedar Creek for a tour of our long-term research experiments and citizen science projects and to learn more about the work we do with citizen scientists of all ages and backgrounds.

Intended Audience: Anyone interested

Fee: $35; pre-registration required

Note: depart the Intercontinental Hotel at 8:00 a.m. 

Saturday May 20, 2017 8:00am - 1:00pm
Offsite - depart from Intercontinental Hotel

8:30am

WORKSHOP: Writing Competitive Proposals to Federal Agencies (pre-registration required)
John McLaughlin - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Ellen McCallie - National Science Foundation; Tony Beck - National Institutes of Health; Tim Watkins - National Park Service; Helen Wechsler - Institute of Museum and Library Services

This workshop aids researchers and practitioners in submitting proposals to federal agencies, such as the National Science Foundation (NSF), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Institute of Museum and Libraries Services (IMLS). The workshop focuses on: 1) funding programs and opportunities; 2) proposal review process and merit review criteria; 3) characteristics of competitive proposals; and 4) common weaknesses of proposals. The workshop is targeted toward those who have not yet been awarded a federal grant as well as anyone seeking to improve their proposal writing skills. In addition, the National Park Service will discuss mechanisms for conduction research in parks, in-kind support, helping PIs understand science priorities of parks.

Intended Audience: Professionals/Researchers/Project Managers. Note that in most cases, recipient organizations of federal funds have to have substantial financial capacity (policies and procedures in place) to receive federal funds.

Fee: None; pre-registration required Note that in most cases, recipient organizations of federal funds have to have substantial financial capacity (policies and procedures in place) to receive federal funds.

Saturday May 20, 2017 8:30am - 11:30am
Intercontinental Hotel - State Room 2

8:30am

FIELD TRIP: Mississippi River Canoe Day Trip (pre-registration and additional fee $55 - SOLD OUT)
Slice through the heart of the Twin Cities in 9-person voyageur canoes as we join guides on this scenic morning paddle down the Mississippi River. These popular adventures take place in the local National Park – the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area (MNRRA). You will discover wildlife and experience the amazing human history of the River.

Intended Audience: Anyone interested

Fee: $55; pre-registration required - SOLD OUT

Note: Depart from the Intercontinental

Saturday May 20, 2017 8:30am - 12:30pm
Offsite - depart from Intercontinental Hotel

9:00am

WORKING GROUP: Education

Education Working Group will host an open meeting to discuss what our next steps should be to advance the deliberate design and use of citizen science for learning.

We will collectively reflect on what we have learned at the conference and in our own practice to inform an action plan to advance citizen science and learning. Questions we will address include: What does the community need from us as the CSA’s Education Working Group? What research needs to be done? Should we collaborate on white papers or grey literature? on policy initiatives? on seeking funding for cross-programmatic evaluation and/or research efforts?

We would be well served and honored to have you join this discussion. The plan that comes from this meeting will inform not only the Education Working Group’s efforts, but will also contribute to the CSA’s strategic planning.


Saturday May 20, 2017 9:00am - 11:00am
Offsite: Science Museum of Minnesota (Rooms 5 & 6)

9:00am

9:00am

WORKSHOP: Filling the 'Ethics Gap' in Citizen Science Research (pre-registration required)
Anne Bowser - Wilson Center; Lisa Rasmussen - University of North Carolina, Charlotte; Caren Cooper - North Carolina State University and North Carolina Museum of Nature Sciences

We have received an NSF grant to sponsor a small NSF workshop to explore ethical issues in citizen science this summer. As a prelude to that workshop, we want to hold a CSA pre-workshop at the CSA conference to solicit input from a wide variety of CS participants and practitioners to inform the conference. We anticipate this CSA workshop being very discussion-intensive, including round table discussions and report-backs to the larger group. The result, we hope, will be insights into the current ethical culture in citizen science, plus a list of ethical concerns, a list of current ethical practices, and some priority-setting regarding the most urgent ethical challenges facing the field.

Intended Audience: Practitioners and participants interested in ethical issues arising in CS research

Fee: None; pre-registration required

Saturday May 20, 2017 9:00am - 12:00pm
Intercontinental Hotel - State Room 1

12:00pm

Public Citizen Science Festival at the Science Museum of Minnesota (free admission with CSA namebadge)
Immerse yourself in a public engagement experience – join peers and the public at the Science Museum of Minnesota’s Citizen Science Festival! At the Citizen Science Festival, 25 project leaders will share their current projects with the public and engage in hands-on activities. Observe how museum visitors discover how to monitor animals and insects, explore the impacts of light pollution, map precipitation, and record water quality. Engaging the public in science is never a simple task; see it in action, learn from your peers, and maybe even engage yourself! Did you know? CitiSci2017 conference registrants enjoy complimentary access to the Science Museum of Minnesota all week during the conference! Show your conference badge to get in.

This event is sponsored by: Science Museum of MinnesotaImages: The Crowd & The Cloud

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Citizen Water Monitoring Programs at the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
Laurie Sovell - Minnesota Pollution Control Agency

Sound Around Town - Twin Cities
Caren Cooper - North Carolina State University and SciStarter

HerpMapper.org
Christopher Smith - HerpMapper.org

Red-headed Woodpecker Recovery Project
Caitlin Potter - University of Minnesota Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve

CoCoRaHS - The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network
Noah Newman - CoCoRaHS

CitSci.org - Helping You Do Great Science
Sarah Newman - CitSci.org, Natural Resource Ecology Lab, Colorado State University

Cedar Creek Wildlife Survey
Jonathan Poppele - Minnesota Wildlife Tracking Project

AIS Detectors & AIS Trackers
Eleanor Burkett - University of Minnesota

Zooniverse
Julie Feldt - Zooniverse at Adler Planetarium

Minnesota Bumble Bee Survey
Elaine Evans - U of MN Department of Entomology

Minnesota Bee Atlas
Rob Blair

Monarch Larva Monitoring Project
Karen Oberhauser - University of Minnesota

Minnesota Dragonfly Society
Ami Thompson - Minnesota Dragonfly Society

NOAA Marine Debris Monitoring and Assessment Project
Carlie Herring - NOAA Marine Debris Program

ScienceCache: Collecting Phenology Data Through Geocaching
Tab Graves - U.S. Geological Survey, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

GLOBE Observer
Sarah McCrea - SSAI/NASA LaRC

NASA Solve - public Participation Opportunities at NASA
Amy Kaminski - NASA

CitSciBio: The Biomedical Citizen Science Hub
Katrina Theisz - National Cancer Institute

Counting Birds for Science with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology
Robyn Bailey - Cornell Lab of Ornithology

iNaturalist.org
Scott Loarie - California Academy of Sciences

The Globe at Night Citizen-Science Campaign
Constance Walker - National Optical Astronomy Observatory

SciStarter
Catherine Hoffman

SciGirls
Leah Defenbaugh - SciGirls

Habitat Network
Megan C. Whatton - The Nature Conservancy

Bumble Bee Conservation in Your Garden and Beyond
Susan Carpenter - University of Wisconsin--Madison Arboretum


Saturday May 20, 2017 12:00pm - 4:00pm
Offsite: Science Museum of Minnesota